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Craner Family Histories
Saturday, 25 October 2014
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Craner Family Histories
Written by Jeri Ann Fogg   
A Collection of Histories
Of
George Benjamin and Elizabeth West Craner
And
Their Descendents

  

The Ancient Arms Crest

 

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS:
GEORGE BENJAMIN CRANER (1799-1854) AND ELIZABETH WEST (1799-1869)
ELIZABETH CRANER (1818-1864)
MARY CRANER (1820-1846)
GEORGE BENJAMIN CRANER, JR. (1822-1824)
JOSEPH CRANER (1824-1898)
THOMAS CRANER (1826 -1881*)
GEORGE CRANER (1829-1904)
SARAH EMMA JENKINS CRANER (1842-1880)
GEORGE CRANER (1857-1935)
EMMA CRANER (1885-1971)
RUTH CRANER (1891 -1967)
WILLIAM RICHARD CRANER (1905 -2006)
JOHN JENKINS CRANER (1860-1931)
JOHN THOMAS CRANER (1881-1926)
ELIZA ELIZABETH CRANER (1862-1941)
EDWARD CRANER (1864-1882)
EMMA CRANER (1865-1867)
JOSEPH CRANER (1867-1891)
MARY ANN CRANER (1870-1947)
OWEN CLIFFORD DUNN (1891-1943)
EMMA DUNN (1893-1963)
GERTRUDE DUNN (1895-1974)
RUBY DUNN (1897-1897)
EMILE CRANER DUNN (1898-1989)
SADIE MARIE DUNN (1902-1995)
MARY LEONA DUNN (1905-1992)
JOHN EDGAR DUNN (1908-1985)
ANNIS ELIZABETH DUNN (1911-1995)
SETH ARNOLD DUNN (1918-1984)
HARRIETT CRANER (1872-1880)
MARTHA JANE CRANER (1875-1875)
SARAH PAMELIA CRANER (1876-1877)
EMELINE B. CRANER (1878-1878)
CLARA AGNES CRANER (1880-1880)
WILLIAM CRANER (1832-1838)
HARRIET ANN CRANER (1834-1874)
ABRAHAM FREDERICK (1836-1878)
ANN CRANER (1838-1906)
JOHN CRANER (1842-1903)
JOHN HARRISON CRANER (1866-1925)
JOHN CLARENCE CRANER (1885-1950)
WILLIAM CARLOS CRANER
BERTHA MAY CRANER (1889-1967)
EDITH CRANER (1891-1946)
ALTHA JANE CRANER (1891-1946)
GEORGE MELVIN CRANER (1894-1956)
ARLETH (BINK) LYLE CRANER (1896-1965)
ARLETH (PETE) CRANER
DEWEY MAINE CRANER (1898-1965)
WINNIE RAE CRANER (1902-1978)
ZELDA CRANER (1904-1906)
ROSS LEE CRANER (1907-1997)
NEOLA DUTCHIE ROSE CRANER (1911-1996)
JACQUIE LOU DAYLEY (1933 - )
WINNIE RAE DAYLEY (1937 - )
MARTHA CRANER (1844-1916)

 


GEORGE BENJAMIN CRANER (1799-1854) AND ELIZABETH WEST (1799-1869)

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For several generations, the Craners lived in the villages of Maxstoke, Fillongley and the town of Coventry, Warwickshire, England. George Benjamin was born in Coventry 3 June 1799. He was the oldest of two children born to George and Elizabeth Robinson Craner. He was christened twice, once in Holy Trinity, Coventry, Warwickshire, England 13 June 1799 and again at St. John’s, Coventry, Warwickshire, England, 13 September 1802. His parents had both been born in Coventry as well as his grandparents, William and Elizabeth Moore Craner.
Elizabeth West, George Benjamin’s wife, was born 1 March 1799 in Fillongley, Warwickshire, England. She was the daughter of William and Elizabeth Ranger West. She was christened 17 March 1799 in Fillongley, Warwickshire, England. She was raised in the village of Fillongley. All of these villages and towns are only three to four miles apart.
George Benjamin Craner and Elizabeth West were married 8 Feb 1819 in Fillongley, Warwickshire, England. Neither one of them could write their name. George Benjamin worked as a farm laborer. The family was very poor and when the children were old enough, as early as 13, they worked as servants or in the case of the son, Joseph; he was apprenticed as a tailor.
They were the parents of twelve children:

Name: Birth Date: Death Date:
1. Elizabeth Craner 2 Jul 1818 Jan 1864
2. Mary Craner 1 Apr 1820 16 Jan 1846
3. George Benjamin Craner, Jr. 16 Apr 1822 bur 8 Feb 1824
4. Joseph Craner 17 Nov 1824 3 Aug 1898
5. Thomas Craner 9 Apr 1826
6. George Craner 1 June 1829 17 July 1904
7. William Craner 1 Jul 1832 bur 8 May 1838
8. Harriet Ann Craner 26 Apr 1834 15 Sep 1874
9. Abraham Frederick Craner c. 3 Apr 1836 bur 23 Feb 1902
10. Ann Craner 15 Jul 1838 25 Apr 1906
11. John Craner 8 Jul 1842 4 Aug 1903
12. Martha Craner 16 May 1844 19 Sep 1916

Two of the children, George Benjamin, Jr. (age 2) and William (age 5) died in their youth.
In 1845, the Craners listened to the missionaries of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. The gospel must have given the Craners new hope and vision. Elizabeth West Craner was the first to be baptized, 5 June 1845, followed by their son, George, 1 January 1846, then Harriet, 6 Jan 1846. George Benjamin followed on 10 March 1846. Three other children were baptized in England: Ann and Martha 1852, and Abraham Frederick 1856. The Saints were encouraged to come to Zion in America when they were able. So, that became the “Craner Dream”.
In 1851, their son, George (age 21) emigrated to the United States. In the next few years, he established a home and a prosperous farm in Tooele, Tooele, Utah. He sent money back to England for his family to come to America.
By this time, Elizabeth, Mary, Joseph, and Thomas were all married or out of the household.
On the 22 February 1854, George Benjamin (age 54) Elizabeth (age 54), Harriet (age 19), Ann (age 15), John (age 11) Martha (age 9) set sail from Liverpool to the United States on the ship Windermere with a total of 477 Latter Day Saints. Joseph and Abraham Frederick planned to immigrate later. Eventually, Frederick emigrated in May 1862, but Joseph, his wife and family stayed in England.
A detailed description of the voyage is as follows:

Voyage on the ship Windermere
“As the vessel started in motion the songs of Zion blending in the soul inspiring harmony, thrilled the souls of the passengers and their many friends standing on the shore gazing at the departed vessel, shouting farewell, goodbye, with eyes streaming with tears; doubtless, recalling that only the night before seven vessels with all aboard went down in the depths of the channel.
As the land disappeared in the distance the sweet singing ceased and many began to feel sick. About 8 p.m. the first day at sea, an old gentleman, named Squires, died. All that night the wind howled fiercely, the sea was rough, the ship was driven from its course towards the Isle of Aton. About 11 p.m. off Holy Head, which is a most dangerous point, and the scene of frequent ship wrecks, was passed. On the morning of the 23rd, Father Squire, who died the night before was thrown overboard. The sea was still rough and the wind was blowing. During the day the Windermere sailed by the remains of a wrecked vessel. Masts, sails, and other fragments were floating around. Likely, a few hours previous, many departed souls had tenaciously clung to these same objects for relief that never came. All had been consigned to a watery grave, for no signs of life remained and the rolling waves swept over the bodies of the lifeless sleepers, while the wind howled its requiem for the dead.
Some were now beginning to recover from sea sickness, but many were still ill and some confined to their berths. About this time, birds were seen flying which would rise from the water and fly a short distance and drop into the water again. Life on the Windermere was now growing monotonous; for its accommodations were poor for so many passengers, and then it did not sail like the ocean steamers now do which are propelled by steam. The Windermere was eight weeks, four nights and five days sailing from Liverpool to New Orleans, which now can be made in six or seven days. We were on the Atlantic Ocean about seven weeks without seeing land.
On the 12th of March from 7 to 8 in the morning an exceedingly fierce storm arose. The wind roared like one of our mountain winds. The masts cracked and the sails were cut to pieces. The Captain of the Windermere expressed fears that the ship couldn’t stand so heavy a sea, and in speaking to Daniel Garn, the President of the Saints on board said, “I am afraid the ship can’t stand this storm. Mr. Garn, if there be a God, as your people say there is, you had better talk to him if he will hear you. I have done all I can for the ship, and I am afraid with all that can be done, she will go down.”
Elder Garn went to the Elders, who presided over the nine wards in the ship and requested them to get all the Saints on board to fast and call a prayer meeting to be held in each ward at 10 a.m. and pray that we might be delivered from the danger. The waves dashed with white foam. The storm continued in all its fury but precisely at 10 a.m., the prayer meetings were held. The ship rolled from side to side. On one side the Saints were hanging by their hands and on the other they were standing on their heads. Then the ship would roll on the other side which would reverse their positions. About this time the large boxes which were tied with ropes under the berths broke loose and with pots, pans and kettles rolled with terrible force on each side of the vessel.
Although the prayers were fervent and earnest, as the pleading of poor souls brought face to face with danger and death, they ceased their prayers to watch and dodge the untied boxes and great confusion prevailed for some time. The wind roared like a hurricane. Sail after sail was torn to shreds and lost. The waves were very large and, as far as the eye could see, seemed to be one angry mass of rolling white foam. The hatches were fastened down. This awful storm lasted about 18 hours, and then abated a little, but it was stormy from the 8th of March until the 18th. Observation taken by the quadrant showed that the ship was in the same latitude as it was on the 8th.
On March 20th, which was two days after this terrible storm, the small pox broke out. One of three sisters was taken down with it. She had a light attack and recovered, but her two sisters then came down with it and both died. After that 37 others–40 in all, came down with it. Three days after the breaking out of the small pox the ship took fire under the cooking gallery. At this time, we had not seen land for three weeks or more. When the cry of “FIRE, the ships on FIRE” rang through the vessel, wild excitement and consternation prevailed everywhere. The sailors plied water freely. All the water buckets on board were brought into use and soon the fire was under control.
When the last of the three sisters, who took the small pox died, it was evening. W. W. Burton thought he would get a good place from which to see the body thrown overboard. So, he got outside the vessel and seated himself on the ledge extending out from the deck placing each arm around a rope that led to the rigging. His feet were hanging over the ocean and the ship was sailing about ten knots per hour. By this time darkness was fast setting in, but here he sat waiting to get a good view when the corpse would be thrown into the watery grave, where some said sharks were constantly seen following the prey. Brother Burton went to sleep and the funeral passed without him knowing about it. The sound of feet walking on the deck roused him from his slumber. A chill ran through him, his chair almost stood on end when he sensed his condition. Here he had been asleep, his feet handing off the side of the vessel which was rocking to and fro. He wondered how he had escaped falling overboard. It was now totally dark. He climbed into the ship and resolved never to expose himself so again.
About this time, the stench of the small pox was fearful in every part of the vessel. Emma Brooks was the name of the young lady just thrown over board. Her sister, Fanny, had died the same day, about half past 1:00 o’clock p.m. and was also thrown over board at 2:00 o’clock. The funeral service at sea is the most melancholy and solemn scene perhaps ever witnessed, especially when the sea is calm. A stillness like that often prevailed while an old sailor at intervals would imitate the doleful toiling of the bell of some old church such as heard in some parts of England. Funerals were becoming frequent.
About this time the Windermere had been about six weeks out from Liverpool and the passengers had never seen land from the time they had entered the Atlantic. The days were now generally mild and the weather very pleasant.
The sun set in grandeur and the bright pale moon seemed to be straight above our heads. On April 8th a voice called out, “THERE IS LAND!” Excitement prevailed and there was a rush to see land once more. This land was the Isle of Domingo. On the 9th of April we came in sight of the Island of Cuba. On this day at 10:00 a.m. a young man named Dee died of small pox. At the time of his death, the wind had ceased blowing, not a ripple on the water. The sea appeared bright and clear and seemed as a sea of glass. The young man that had died was sewed in a white blanket and at the feet was placed a heavy weight of coal. A plank was then placed with one end resting in the port hole in the side of the ship and the other near the main hatch way. The body was then placed on this plank. Then the doleful tolling of the bell began. Elder McGhee made a brief address, suitable of the occasion and offered a short prayer, after which the body and bedding of the young man were thrown over board. The ship was standing perfectly still and the body could be seen sinking in the water until it appeared no longer than a person’s hand. Some thought it was seen sinking for full fifteen minutes, others still longer, some said half an hour.
The passengers of the Windermere had passed through a terrible storm, the panic created by the ship taking FIRE, their number decreased by the small pox; still another fearful calamity threatened them. The fresh water supply was getting short and the stores of provisions were failing. The passengers were now limited to one hard small sea biscuit of a day’s rations.
The Captain sent some sailors in a small boat to intercept a ship that was passing in hopes of getting more provisions, but they failed. The Windermere now passed the Western points of the Island of Cuba. The passengers had a good view of the light house located on the most western point. The Gulf of Mexico was before them. The Gulf Stream flowed in like a vast river. Just think of this stream 500 miles across it, very deep and constantly flowing.
On the morning of April 20th, the ship entered the mouth of the Mississippi River. The passengers were more glad to look upon the plantations of orange groves that bordered the banks of the river than the great strong surging waves of the Atlantic which they had left behind them.
Sometimes the Negroes would call from the shore and bid the emigrants welcome.
Among the passengers of the Windermere ship were George Benjamin Craner, age 54, his wife Elizabeth West, age 54, and their four children: Harriet, age 20, Ann, age 15, John, age 11, and Martha age 9.
They arrived at New Orleans the 24th of April 1854. During the voyage, there were six marriages, six births, and ten deaths.” (61 days on the water)
On the morning after arriving at New Orleans, eleven persons suffering with small pox were sent to the Luzenberg Hospital, according to orders from the Health Officers at the port. Elder Long and five others were selected to remain at New Orleans to attend the sick until they were able to go on.
The rest of the Company continued the journey from New Orleans on the 27th of April on board a steamboat to St. Louis, Missouri–a distance of 1000 miles up the Mississippi River. They then followed the Missouri River to Kansas City.
At Kansas City, George Benjamin Craner died on the 18th of May 1854* (age 54) from an attack of cholera. He was buried “on the plains of Kansas” in a grave with two others, a young lady and a child, who had died of the same disease. Elizabeth and the four children continued the journey to Salt Lake City, Utah in the Fifth Company 1854.
Daniel Garn was selected to be Captain of the Fifth Company. He had been Captain of the Saints while on the ship Windermere. Captain Daniel Garn was released from presiding over the German Mission. And so accompanying him from Germany to Salt Lake City were a small company of Saints from the German Mission. They had traveled together across the Atlantic and continued together across the plains.
After arriving with his company in Westport (Kansas City) President Garn was appointed to take charge of a company of P.E. Fund Emigrants. To whom were added the German Saints referred to above. Captain Garn was assisted by Elder William F. Carter, who was returning from a Mission to Hindostau.
The Fifth Company 1854 with Captain Daniel Garn and his company, with about 40 wagons, left Westport (Kansas City) July 2nd and on August 14th was reported to have arrived near Ash Hallow. On 22nd of September they were near Fort Bridger.
President Brigham Young sent a group of Saints from Salt Lake City to meet this company of Saints crossing the plains, and take to them fresh teams and provisions, and assist them to the Valley. Among this group of Assisters was Alexander Harris. He was born in Tennessee. He had accepted the Gospel there and had crossed the plains earlier. He met Harriet Craner, age 20 and fell in love with her and married her later, 6th of June 1855 in Salt Lake City, Utah. This company finally arrived in Salt Lake City, Utah 1st of October 1854 and camped on Union Square.
Elizabeth West Craner and her four children continued on to Tooele, Tooele, Utah where her son, George, had a home and farm to welcome them. What a welcome this must have been! After many years of preparations and finally to be here in Zion! One can only imagine the sorrow it must have been for Elizabeth in losing her husband and having to convey this news to her son, George. Elizabeth’s strong faith and love of the Savior must have buoyed her up many times. The sacrifice that this family made in joining the church and the desire to be obedient in obeying the prophet’s commandment in coming to Zion shows much courage and faith.
Elizabeth continued to live with her son, George and his family, in Tooele, Tooele, Utah until her death 8 April 1869. She was 70 years old. She is buried in the Tooele Cemetery.
Sources: Family Group Sheets, Naomi Lowe, 607 Holiday Drive, Brigham City, Utah 84302
Histories, Vera McBride, Beth Sorenson, 5311 Brush Creek Bay, West Valley City, Utah 84120
Maxstoke, Fillongley, Coventry (Holy Trinity and St John’s), England Parish Records
Details from Immigration Records
Book: Lewis John Bowen and Adelaide Honey, “Together Forever”, compiled and edited by Merlin Bowen, May 1996
*George Craner’s Temple Record Book shows death date as 15 May 1854

ELIZABETH CRANER (1818-1864)
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Elizabeth was born 2 July 1818* in Fillongley, Warwickshire, England. She is the oldest child of 12 children born to George Benjamin and Elizabeth West Craner. She was christened 11 July 1819 in Fillongley, Warwickshire, England. At that time her parents lived in Wood End in Fillongley. Her father was a laborer.
As a young child, her family moved to Hall End in Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England. This is where Elizabeth grew up. All of her brothers and sisters were born and raised in Maxstoke.
At the age of 23 she met William Kennerley. William was a carpenter. They were married 22 July 1842 at Birmingham, Warwickshire, England. They made their home in Maxstoke.
Missionaries visited Maxstoke during 1840-1850 and Elizabeth’s parents and some of her brothers and sisters joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. The church encouraged the saints to come to Zion in America. Therefore, Elizabeth’s parents and five of her brothers and sisters left Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England for America. This must have made a large impact on Elizabeth and her family. Her brother, George, came to America in 1851 to establish a home and earn enough money to pay for his family’s expenses to come to America. His parents and younger brother, John and three of his younger sisters, Harriett, Ann, and Martha came later in 1854. Elizabeth’s father, George, lost his life on the prairie in Kansas. Her mother continued on to Utah with the four children.

Elizabeth and William were the parents of eight children:

Name: Birth Date: Burial Date
1. James Kennerley abt 1843 9 Jan 1845
2. Catharine Kennerley abt 1845
3. Mary Ann Kennerley (Polly) abt 1847
4. Thomas Kennerley abt 1849 30 Dec 1856
5. Frederick Kennerley abt 1851
6. Helen Kennerley (Ellen) abt 1853
7. Elizabeth Kennerley (Betsy) abt 1855
8. William Kennerley abt 1857

Elizabeth and William lived in Maxstoke and Coleshill all their married life. Elizabeth died in Coleshill, Warwickshire, England at 45 years of age. She was buried 26 Jan 1864 in Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England.

 

 

Census, 1841, Maxstoke: William Kennerly (age 20) single, male laborer, Elizabeth Cranner (age 20) still living in her parents’ household
Census, 1851, Coleshill: William Kennerley (age 29) carpenter, Elizabeth (age 28), Catharine (age 8) scholar, Mary Ann (age 4)
Thomas (age 8 mo)
Census, 1861, Coleshill: William Kennerley (age 43), Elizabeth Kennerley (age 42), Ellen Kennerley (age 4), Elizabeth Kennerley (age 1)
Census, 1871, Coleshill: William Kennerley (age 54), Ellen Kennerley (age 16), William Kennerley (age 7)
Sources: Family Group Sheets, Naomi Lowe, 607 Holiday Drive, Brigham City, Utah 84302
*George Craner’s Temple Record Book Maxstoke, Coleshill, England Parish and Census Records

 

MARY CRANER (1820-1846)
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Mary was born 1 April 1820* in Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England. She was the second child and the second daughter of George Benjamin and Elizabeth West Craner. She was christened 8 April 1821 in Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England. The family lived in Hall End in Maxstoke. Her father was a laborer.
At the age of 23 she married Joseph Bates 17 April 1843 in Maxstoke. Joseph was a laborer and Mary was a servant. Mary’s brother, Joseph Craner and her mother, Elizabeth Craner were witnesses to the marriage.
Mary and Joseph did not have any children.
Mary lost her life in her 26th year due to Dropsy. She died the 16 Jan 1846 and was buried 18 Jan 1846 in Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England.

Information on Joseph Bates:
Joseph Bates, b. 10 May 1819, Nuneaton, Warwickshire, England, d. 8 November 1897, Tooele, Tooele, Utah
Marriage: 17 April 1843 Mary Craner, b. 1 April 1820, Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England, d.16 Jan 1846, Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England
Marriage: 4 Jan 1847 Maria Ridding (Redding) Bates, b. 18 April 1829, Parish of St Phillips, Birmingham, Warwickshire, England, d. 25 November 1871, Tooele, Tooele, Utah
Marriage: 26 October 1882 Elizabeth Summers, b. 1823, Nuneaton, Warwickshire, England

Joseph Bates married Maria Ridding or Redding 4 January 1847 in Maxstoke.
In 1865 he emigrated to America. (Probably helped by George Craner, brother of Mary Craner, his first wife)

1851 census address Dukes End Maxstoke
Joseph Bates, head of household, age 29, born Nuneaton
Maria Bates, wife, age 23, born Birmingham
Harriet Bates, daughter, age 2, born Maxstoke
Emeila Bates, age 4 months, born Maxstoke
New York Passenger List 1851-1891
Joseph Bates, age 45, male, occupation farmer
Maria Bates, age 38, female, wife
Harriet Bates, age 18, daughter, occupation servant
Mary Bates, age 11, daughter, child
Emma Bates, age 7, daughter, child
Thomas Bates, age 3, son, child
Arrival date, 6 July 1865, Port of departure, Liverpool, Place of origin, Great Britain Ship Arkwright
Port of arrival, New York
Joseph Bates and family traveled with the William S.S. Willies Mormon Pioneer Overland Company, September 1865.

1870 census Tooele City, Utah
Joseph Bates, age 49, occupation, farmer, born in England
Maria Bates, age 48, keeping house, born in England
Mary Bates, age 17, born in England
Emma Bates, age 12, born in England
Thomas Bates, age 8, born in England

According to the census in 1870 in Tooele City, Utah, the Bates lived next door to Martha and George Tanner. (Martha was a sister to Mary Craner Bates, Joseph Bates’ first wife)
Sources: Family Group Sheet, Naomi Lowe, 607 Holiday Drive, Brigham City, Utah 84302
History compiled by Heather Evans, England
Maxstoke Parish Records, Maxstoke, England, Tooele, Utah Census records
*George Craner’s Temple Record Book

GEORGE BENJAMIN CRANER, JR. (1822-1824)
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George Benjamin was born 16 April 1822 in Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England. He was the third child and first son born to George Benjamin and Elizabeth West Craner. He was christened 11 May 1823 in Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England.
This new baby son must have brought much joy and happiness to Elizabeth and George. They must have also felt great sorrow as this child lost his life in February 1824, not quite two years old. He was buried 8 February 1824 in Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England.
Sources: Family Group Sheets, Naomi Lowe, 607 Holiday Drive, Brigham City, Utah 84302
Maxstoke Parish Records

 

JOSEPH CRANER (1824-1898)
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Joseph was born 17 November 1824 in Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England. He was the fourth child and the second son born to George Benjamin and Elizabeth West Craner. He was christened 12 December 1824 at Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England. The family lived in Hall End in Maxstoke. His father was a laborer.

Joseph Craner
Susanna Green
At the age of 13, Joseph became an apprentice in the Art or Trade of a Tailor to Joseph Meller and his son, William Meller, 17 March 1838. An Indenture was made between the Mellers and George Craner. He was to serve as an Apprentice until he turned twenty-one years old. The apprenticeship required Joseph to be “an upright individual, not to gamble or haunt Taverns, or Playhouses, waste the goods of his Masters, play at cards, dice or any other unlawful games.” The Mellers were to provide Joseph with board and lodging, coats, waistcoats and trousers. Joseph’s parents were to provide him with every other article of clothing including his clean linens.
When Joseph was almost 25 years of age he married Susanna Green in Keresley, Warwickshire, England, 25 October 1849. His occupation was a tailor.
Joseph and Susanna were the parents of eight children:

Name: Birth Date: Burial Date:
1. Alice Craner b 7 Oct 1850, chr 13 Oct 1850 16 Oct 1850
2. Emma Craner b 29 Apr 1852, chr 30 May 1852 1925
3. Elizabeth Craner b 14 Mar 1853, chr 9 Apr 1854 19 May 1856
4. Annie Craner b 11 May 1856, chr 24 Aug 1856 d. 1 Oct 1921
5. Clara Craner b 1 Jan 1860, chr 17 Feb 1860
6. George Craner b 7 Oct 1861, chr 9 Dec 1861 15 Dec 1861
7. Laura Craner b 25 Apr 1865, chr 6 Aug 1865 12 Jan 1954
8. Joseph Craner Jr. b 17 Jan 1867, chr 10 Mar 1867 d. 19 Mar 1934

According to immigration records, Joseph, Susanna, and three of their children, Emma, Annie, Clara, were listed on the ship, John J Boyd to depart in April 1862 for America. For some reason, they didn’t go. The family was credited 19 pounds. Joseph is listed with his brother, Frederick to go on the William Tapscott. Although, the records show that only Frederick transferred from the John J Boyd to the William Tapscott and came to America alone, departing 14 May 1862.
All of Joseph’s children were born in Keresley, so it appears that the family made the decision not to come to America and made their home in Keresley, Warwickshire, England.
Joseph’s younger brother, George, was the first member of the Craner family to come to America in 1851. His parents, George Benjamin and Elizabeth Craner, and his brother John, and three of his sisters, Harriett, Ann, and Martha came in 1854. His father lost his life on the prairie in Kansas. George built a home for his family in Tooele, Tooele, Utah and helped them financially to make the trip.
It doesn’t appear that Joseph and his family became members of the church when his parents became interested in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints in the 1840's. Maybe this is one of the reasons that they stayed in England.
Joseph died 3 Aug 1898 in Keresley, Warwickshire, England. He was buried 7 Aug 1898 in Keresley, Warwickshire, England. He was 73 years old.
Sources: Family Group Sheets, Naomi Lowe, 607 Holiday Drive, Brigham City, Utah 84302
Details from Immigration Records
Maxstoke, Keresley, England Parish Records

 

THOMAS CRANER (1826 -1881*)
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Thomas was born 9 April 1826 in Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England. He was the fifth child and third son of twelve children born to George Benjamin and Elizabeth West Craner. He was christened 6 May 1827 in Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England.
In a census taken in Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England in 1841, at the age of 13, Thomas was working and living in the household of Captain Thomas Dilke, a Naval Officer, as a male servant, along with several other male and female servants.
In a census taken in Lindridge, Worcestershire, England in 1851, at the age of 24, Thomas was working at the Lindridge Vicerage for Charles Wilson Landor as a groom. The records show that he was unmarried.
Thomas appears to still be working at the Lindridge Vicarage in 1861 when that census was taken. His occupation is listed as a coachman and gardener
According to the census taken in 1871, in Birmingham, Warwickshire, England, there is a Thomas Craynor, age 44, living there on Park Street working as a laborer.
There is no record of his marriage or whether he ever joined the Church and emigrated to America. Little else is known about Thomas.
Sources: Family Group Sheets, Naomi Lowe, 607 Holiday Drive, Brigham City, Utah 84302
Maxstoke Parish Records, Census Records of Maxstoke, Lindridge, Birmingham, England
*Death date taken from George Craner’s Temple Record Book

 

GEORGE CRANER III (1829-1904)
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George was born 1 June 1829 in Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England. He was the sixth child and the fourth son of George Benjamin and Elizabeth West Craner. He was christened 28 June 1829 in Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England. The family lived in Hall End in Maxstoke. George’s father was a laborer.
George Craner
As a child, George worked very hard on a farm. Most of the cultivation and planting of crops was done by hand. The plowing was done with a one-way plow; one horse and man to guide the plow. George’s parents did not think it was necessary for their children to receive an education through the schools, but believed in hard work and experience. They secured a job for him following a plow, filling a position known as a “Clod-Hopper.” However, there was a lady living in the same community where George was who took a special liking to him, and she paid for him to have a three-year course under a private tutor. That was the only formal schooling he received.
When George finished this education, he worked at a castle in England at what was called “Gentlemen’s Service.” It was his duty to see that the tables were in the best of order at any time during the day when his master wanted to eat. He had to shine the silver and glassware. At this job he earned and saved enough money to bring him to the United States.
In 1845 George’s family listened to the missionaries. His mother was the first to be baptized on 5 June 1845. George was the next one. He was baptized 1 January 1846. He was 16 years old. He was followed by his sister Harriet, 6 January 1846 and his father, 10 March 1846. Three other members of his family were baptized also, Ann, and Martha in 1852, and Abraham Frederick in 1856 in England.
Five years later, when George was 21, he took passage on a small sailing ship George W. Bourne from Liverpool England for America. He was the first of his family to come to America. They left England, 22 January 1851 and landed in New Orleans on 20 March 1851. (57 days) There were 281 Latter-day Saints aboard. He was one of the members under the direction of William Gibson. Elder Gibson proudly reported that “no company of Saints had ever crossed the Atlantic with less sea-sickness. This pleasant voyage was marked by one marriage, three births, two converts among crew members, and the death of a small boy who was dying of consumption when he boarded the ship.”
After their arrival in New Orleans, the emigrants boarded the steamboat Concordia and on 22 March 1851 began about a thousand-mile journey up the Mississippi to St. Louis. The steamboat arrived in St. Louis, Missouri on 29 March 1851. The Saints then journeyed on to Council Bluffs. (Kanesville at that time) Most of the Saints would then secure employment to procure an outfit for crossing the plains and continue on to the Salt Lake Valley. There were a number, however, that remained in the States. Such was true of George Craner, who stayed one year at Kanesville.
On 21 September 1851, the Saints in Kanesville were given an order by letter by President Brigham Young to come to Salt Lake City, Utah:

“We send unto you our beloved brethren, Ezra T. Benson and Jedediah M. Grant, for the special purpose of counseling and assisting you to come to this place, and we desire you to give heed to their counsel in all things and come to this place with them next season and FAIL NOT.”
Come all ye officers in the church and all ye officers in the State or county. There is no more time for Saints, to hesitate what course they will pursue. We have been calling to the Saints in Pottawatomie ever since we left them to come away, but there has continually been an opposing spirit whispering as if it were, ‘Stay another year and get a better outfit’ until many who had means to come conveniently have nothing left to come with.
We say again, COME HOME. And if you can get one good wagon and team to five families and five teams to 100 souls or no teams at all, more than cows and calves to your hand-carts, you can come here with greater comfort and safety than the Pioneers came here who had nothing to come to. While you will have everything and here is the place for all the Saints to get their outfits for Zion, even from all nations. Therefore, we say again–arise and come HOME. We wish you to evacuate Pottawatomie and the States and next fall be with us all ye Saints of the Most High.”

The next season after receiving President Brigham Young’s order George Craner crossed the plains with the Eighteenth Company with James C. Snow as Captain.
Captain James C. Snow left Kanesville about the middle of June 1852 with a company of nearly 250 souls. He was assisted by Hiram Winters. Charles H. Hales and Salmon Warner as Captains of fifty. Reporting on July 11th, Captain Snow said “the health of the company was good; no sickness had at that time made its appearance among them. The company generally was in fine buoyant spirits, full of hope and anticipating success, relying on the God of Israel to bless in prosecuting their journey to the valley of the mountains.”
The company crossed the Missouri River on 2 July 1852, arrived in Salt Lake City 9 October 1852. (About 4 months crossing the plains)

George Craner had nothing to cross the plains with, as far as personal property. George Craner came out to Tooele, Utah after arriving in Salt Lake City, Utah. He moved, or went there the same month he arrived in Salt Lake City or October 1852. He established himself in Tooele by securing a ten acre farm where he built an adobe house. He worked hard to establish a home and earn enough money to send to his family in England. In 1854 his mother, father and four of his brothers and sisters Harriet, (age 20), Ann (age 15) John (age 11) and Martha (age 9) were able to immigrate to Utah from England. His father, George Benjamin lost his life enroute. He is buried in Kansas.
George’s ingenuity and hard work on his farm was published in an article in the Deseret News, 26 October 1854:

“Brother Craner of Tooele brought into Salt Lake City four sugar beets, which weighed 71½ pounds, one of them weighing 20 pounds. These were about
average in a crop of ½ acre of land.”

Sarah Emma Jenkins

It was in Tooele, on John Rowberry’s farm that he met Sarah Emma Jenkins. They were married 1 January 1857 by Bishop John Rowberry. Sarah Emma was only 14 and George was 27. They
were later sealed in the Endowment House, 10 Sep 1859.

George and Sarah Emma were the parents of twelve children:

Name Birth Date Death Date
1. *George Craner 27 Oct 1857 19 Aug 1935
2. *John Jenkins Craner 5 Apr 1860 1 Apr 1931
3. *Eliza Elizabeth Craner 6 Mar 1862 12 Jun 1941
4. Edward Craner 20 Apr 1864 18 Oct 1882
5. Emma Craner 20 Sep 1865 6 Jan 1867
6. Joseph Craner 15 Nov 1867 3 Jul 1891
7. *Mary Ann Craner 25 Mar 1870 3 Apr 1947
8. Harriett Craner 1 Jul 1872 16 Nov 1880
9. Martha Jane Craner 2 Jun 1875 2 Jun 1875
10. Sarah Pamelia Craner 17 Sep 1876 7 Feb 1877
11. Emeline “B” Craner 24 Feb 1878 23 Jul 1878
12. Clara Craner 10 Feb 1880 10 Feb 1880
*(Only four of these twelve children were married and have children)

Throughout George’s life he was found giving service to others. He assisted three other families financially to emigrate from England. In 1856, he went to Fort Bridger to help Hodgets train of Saints to the Valley. He went to assist in the Echo Canyon War of 1857. He assisted in building a wall around Tooele City during the troubles with the Indians there. He helped to build the beautiful dirt walks in Tooele. He was a City Councilor in Tooele for six years, Alderman for four years and City Treasurer for six years.
He was ordained a High Priest at Grantsville, Utah, 25 June 1877 by President John Taylor. He served as a member of the High Council until called to be First Counselor in the Bishopric to Bishop Thomas Atkins in which he served for over twenty years. He also served as a Sunday School Teacher and received a special recognition at the Church’s Jubilee Celebration in 1899, for 35 years of service.


He has been successful as a farmer and a fruit grower. He has been recognized for raising the first peaches and currants in Tooele County. He has built a beautiful two story rock home and has provided for his mother as well as his own family throughout the years.
He lost his wife, Sarah Emma (age 37), a few days after their last baby girl was born, 14 February 1880. He was 50. He also lost another daughter, Harriett (age 8) that same year. Two years later he lost Edward (age 18).
His integrity and industry has been recognized by the citizens and businessmen in Tooele County. He has been able to help his children to become educated and ambitious in pursuing their endeavors.
He died 18 July 1904 at the age of 75 in Tooele, Tooele, Utah leaving a host of family and friends “to mourn his demise.” (Deseret News, 18 July 1904)

John J, George IV, Elizabeth (Eliza)
George III, Sarah Emma
Joseph, Edward, Mary Ann

Sources: Family Group Sheets, Naomi Lowe, 607 Holiday Drive, Brigham City, Utah 84302
Histories of Vera McBride, Beth Sorenson, 5311 Brush Creek Bay, West Valley City, Utah 84120
Maxstoke Parish Records, Immigration Records

 

SARAH EMMA JENKINS CRANER (1842-1880)
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Sarah Emma Jenkins
Sarah Emma Jenkins has the distinction of being a Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois, baby. She was born there 5 Oct 1842, the second daughter of Edward and Hannah Eliza Barber Jenkins. Sarah joined an older sister, Mary Ann, who had been christened 18 Jan 1839 in Ledbury, Herefordshire, England. Sarah’s parents were living in or near Mathon, Worcestershire England, in 1840 when Elder Wilford Woodruff arrived in that vicinity as a missionary bearing the glad news of the restored gospel of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. Edward and Hannah Eliza were among the over 600 people which Elder Woodruff baptized there during the summer of 1840. They soon went to Liverpool, England, took passage on the ship “North America”, and began the 5,000 mile journey to Nauvoo, Illinois, on 6 Sep 1840, the second ship of English converts to leave that country. Sarah was born about a year after their arrival in that beautiful city located on the banks of the Mississippi River.
Edward was a carpenter by trade and was soon put to work helping in the construction of the Nauvoo Temple which the saints were anxious to complete. He worked there through their first winter in Nauvoo, and in the summer Edward became ill with consumption, or tuberculosis as we now call it. By the time Sarah was born, her father was confined to bed, and quarantined as his disease was infectious. He was only well enough to hold her once, at which time he commented, “She is a pretty little thing.” Edward died three months after Sarah was born, on 24 Jan 1843, in Nauvoo and is buried there. This left Hannah and two little girls, a three year old and a three month old to be cared for by the saints of the city and their ward.
Sarah’s young life in Nauvoo was one of being cared for and protected by those who loved her. She was not quite two years old when the saints’ prophet/leader, Joseph Smith, and his brother, Hyrum, were martyred, much too young to know what was going on except as a witness to the sadness and tears of her mother and others. The first real adjustment for Sarah to make when she was about three years old was to welcome a “father” into the household. Her mother was married in 1845 to a young man, John Rowberry, who was also from Mathon, Worcestershire, England. John had arrived in Nauvoo with the first group of emigrating saints, just a couple of months prior to Sarah’s parents. Since Sarah had never known another father, one can imagine the love that she would have given him.
Sarah Emma and her family were among the early ones to leave Nauvoo when persecution began to be severe, in the spring of 1846. The family went to Council Bluffs, Iowa, and there they were blessed with a baby brother, Joseph A. Rowberry. Two years later another brother, John Edward, was also born in Council Bluffs. Finally, John Rowberry and his young family were ready to begin their trek west to the Salt Lake Valley in 1849. By this time Sarah is six years old and required to do her share to help with the household chores.
As the company traveled toward the Platte River in Nebraska, the wagon train came into what the pioneers called “Dog Town”. Here the prairie dogs could be seen popping their heads out of their holes and barking as the wagon train went by through their territory. The little girls probably got a laugh out of that sight. In this area large herds of buffalo had roamed, so children and mothers used their aprons, skirts, or buckets if they were available to gather the “buffalo chips” as the dung was called, with which to build their fires.
One of the many miracles which this wagon train witnessed was the arrival into camp of three antelope, which came into the corralled wagon area. The animals stood and looked at the women as if they were amazed, giving time for some men to get their guns and kill the antelope, which they dressed and cooked for the supper meal. One of the campers remarked, “The Lord is on our side; he sent those animals into our camp. He knew we needed them.” All enjoyed the feast of fresh, tasty, tender meat for several nights, and they were free with their thanks to the Lord for providing for them.
Finally Echo Canyon was their camping place and all knew that the worst part of their journey was still ahead with two mountains to climb and the creek in Emigration Canyon to be crossed eighteen times. On Sunday morning, 28 October 1849, President Brigham Young with others came to welcome this new company who had camped at the mouth of Emigration Canyon overlooking the valley for the night. Apostle Benson was instructed to take his company into the city, with him to camp on the temple lot and the rest of the group to scatter throughout the city at the homes of those good saints who would give them a place to bathe, a warm meal, and a bed for the few days they would be there.
Sarah Emma with her mother, father, sister and two young brothers did not stay in Salt Lake for very long. In December of 1849, the Rowberry family was sent with Apostle Ezra T. Benson and others to Tooele valley to make their home. Home then became a sagebrush and willow fort and there were only two other families there when the new pioneers arrived. It would have been with some excitement that Sarah would have welcomed a new little sister into the family in 1850 named Permelia (Emma). The winter was one of lots of snow and hardships for this family. After one such severe storm, Sarah’s father had to shovel two feet of snow from the door before a fire could be started.
Within a short time, John built a home for his family and soon opened a store in one room of the house. Sarah and Mary Ann would have been a big help in that enterprise, along with their mother. John immediately became involved in the church and community activities as he was appointed the first Bishop of Tooele and later became the Probate Judge as well as a representative to the legislature. This would mean that the father of the house would be gone a lot of time so the older girls were depended upon to help their mother in care of the children as well as the store and post office which was also established in their home. Another sister, Eliza, came to bless this family on 29 Feb 1852. By this time a 24 foot square community building was built where the children could go to school and church meetings could be held, as well as many social activities that might happen in this growing community.
Sarah Emma turned 10 years old on 5 Oct 1852, but it was not a happy birthday for her. Two days before, Sarah’s mother, Hannah had died, leaving Mary Ann and Sarah along with John to care for the younger children, the baby being just eight months old. Hannah was just 39 years old, but the toil of pioneer life had taken its toll. Unless one has gone through that hardship, one cannot imagine the loss of mother to one so young as Sarah was at that time.

At about this time, a young man from Warwickshire, England, came to Tooele by the name of George Craner. George went to work for John Rowberry and helped him with his many enterprises. He became a friend of the family as he worked for John when they helped to build the mud wall around the city for protection from the Indians and as they built the dirt sidewalks along each street. George worked extra hard to earn his board and room. He did acquire a lot and would spend his evening going to the canyon to get logs to build a home for himself and his family when they should come.
In the meantime, George Craner had succeeded in gaining the needed funds to send to his parents and family for their immigration to the Salt Lake Valley. John Rowberry was his benefactor and helper in this endeavor. He had built a home ready for them to occupy and anxiously awaited their arrival. Little did he know until they arrived in Tooele, that his father, George Benjamin Craner, had died in Kansas City and had been buried near Council Bluffs, Iowa, but his mother and four brothers and sisters completed the journey, arriving in October of 1854.
George Craner
George and Sarah had begun a courtship by this time, and on 1 Jan 1857, they were married with Bishop John Rowberry, Sarah’s step-father, performing the ceremony. Sarah was just two months over 14 years of age at this time, and George was 27 years old. She moved into George’s home with his mother and other family members. Gradually the other members left the home for marriage, but Sarah’s mother-in-law, Elizabeth Craner, lived with them until her death in 1869. George was a good provider, an enterprising young man, and a stalwart in church and community activity. Sarah supported him in his work and soon became a mother to their first child, George, on 27 Oct 1857.
George and Sarah journeyed to the Endowment House in Salt Lake City in September 1859 and were endowed and sealed together as husband and wife on 10 Sep 1859.
A second child, John Jenkins Craner, was born 5 Apr 1860, and their first daughter Eliza Elizabeth (named after their two mothers) was born 6 Mar 1862. By now George and Sarah had a large orchard to care for as George was the first to plant and raise peaches in Tooele. They also had currants and apples. George brought the first hive of bees into the valley to help with pollination of the fruit crop. He was considerate of his wife and to help her in her duties as wife and mother, bought the first sewing machine in the community for her.
George and Sarah had nine more children born to their marriage: Edward, 20 Apr 1864, Emma, 20 Sep 1865; Joseph, 15 Nov 1867; Mary Ann, 25 Mar 1870; Harriett, 1 July 1872; Martha, 2 Jun 1875; Sarah “P”, 17 Sep 1876; Emeline “B”, 24 Feb 1878; and Clara, 10 Feb 1880. Of their twelve children, only four lived to marry and have posterity, George, John Jenkins, Eliza Elizabeth, and Mary Ann. Edward died at age 18, Emma was 16 months old, Joseph drowned at age 24, Harriett lived to age 8, Sarah lived 5 months, Emeline lived 5 months, and Martha and Clara each died the day she was born. All the children were born in Tooele, Tooele, Utah.
Sarah paid the supreme sacrifice for giving life to these twelve, when she died just four days after her last child was born on 14 Feb 1880, at the young age of 37 years from complications due to childbirth. She had five little girls to greet her as she passed through the portals of mortal existence.
As she served her family and community, she and her husband donated food to the poor and needy. She was always faithful and did her duty as far as could be done. Her life’s work seemed to be entirely that of a real mother, not having time with a growing family to engage in public work, but she did what she could in service to her church.
As posterity, our gratitude goes out to this faithful Pioneer woman. She left a legacy of hard work, courage and faith, as well as quiet service and loving care to those around her even though her own burden seemed impossible to bear. Many are the descendants who rise up to call her ‘blessed.’

Sources: History of George Craner by the Craner Family, My Pioneer Ancestors, by Sheri Bowen Libutti, Gina Bowen King, and Dayna Bowen Simons History of Tooele County, Ref 979.243 H2d Jenkins and Craner Family Group Records in poss of Addie L. Stevens
History of Hannah Eliza Barber Jenkins Rowberry, by Addie L. Stevens, 1998 Ledbury Parish Register, Hereford, Eng., FHLC film 992,306 1813-1856 Mathon Parish Register, Worcester, Eng., FHLC film 1,040,017, 1813-1943 1842 Hancock Co., Ill, tax list 1842 census of Nauvoo 2nd Ward, WRF pt 3 (Charles Jenkins) Correspondence, Linda Werts, 3015 SE 59th Ave., Portland, OR 97206, (Charles descendants) Church Emigration of 1849 The Millenial Star, 1849, “Letters from America” by G. A. Smith and E. T. Benson Pioneer Henrietta E. C. Williams story, member of Company Five Sarah Emma Jenkins family history by Lucy B. Forsberg in poss of Addie L. Stevens “Together Forever”, Lewis John Bowen and Adelaide Honey, by Merlin John Bowen

 

GEORGE CRANER IV (1857-1935)
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George Craner was born 27 October 1857 in a one-roomed adobe house built by his father in Tooele, Tooele, Utah. He was the first child of twelve born to George and Sarah Emma Jenkins Craner. He was baptized at the age of nine, 20 July 1867, by Robert Micklejohn in an irrigation ditch in Tooele. The following day he was confirmed a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints by Andrew Gallaway.
George Craner
The community of Tooele, where George grew up, was very small with about one hundred families making up the community. These families enjoyed the same social, school and church activities.
His first home was in an adobe house furnished with stools made out of a flat piece of board or a log split into and the smooth side up. His parents had a bedstead to sleep on. The children slept on the floor. Often straw was put under the quilts to help keep the cold out and to make the beds softer.
George’s parents were very strict with the children and demanded that their children obey them and keep the commandments of the Lord as taught by the church. So, their social life was limited to dances and socials held in the church or school-house. But a fun time was had by all, and they knew all the dances such as the Polka, Quadrille, Virginia Reel, Minuet, Waltz, etc.
George went to school up until he was eighteen or nineteen years of age. He only had to go two blocks to school. They would go only three to five months during the year. He took subjects in reading, writing, arithmetic, spelling, and bookkeeping. The children were required to do a lot of writing each day so large copy books, costing from twenty to twenty-five cents each, were used. All figuring was done on slates with stone pencils.
In the summertime, George worked on the farm, helping to care for the crops, which consisted of raising wheat, oats, alfalfa, potatoes, corn, squash, sugar beets, vegetables, etc. His father also had cows, horses, sheep, hogs, and poultry. In the spring the sheep were sheared and the wool taken to the Provo Woolen Mills and sold or made into clothing for the family.
In the fall, he would go to the canyons about four or five miles away, and haul wood. Sometimes, two or three outfits would go and camp overnight. In this way they could help each other with their loads. Then if they wanted a better type of wood, they would spend two or three weeks cutting and hauling it from deeper canyons or higher mountain ridges.
On the Craner farm were fruit trees of different kinds. In the fall, peaches had to be dried and prepared for home use as well as some to be sold or exchanged for other food supplies or clothing at the local mercantile stores.

George began working out when he was sixteen years of age. He was a partner in one of the first threshing machines in Tooele with five other men. They hired an old machine hand to superintend the work, and each fall would follow the threshing business till it ended weeks later.
As George grew and matured he has been described as being a strong, vigorous, athletic type, being six feet tall, weighing 185 pounds. He has blue eyes, with a perpetual twinkle in them. He wears a short sandy red Van Dyke beard, has light brown hair and a ruddy complexion.
Mary Caroline Adams
By various means, George helped to support himself and the family. When he was nearing the age of 22 he married Mary Caroline Adams, a childhood friend. They were married in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City, Utah on 23 October 1879 by Daniel H. Wells.

George and Mary Caroline were the parents of ten children:

Name Birth Date Death Date
1. Mary Craner 4 Sep 1880 8 Sep 1968
2. George Edward Craner 20 Nov 1882 18 Nov 1973
3. Emma Craner 6 Apr 1885 11 Jul 1971
4. John Thomas Craner 27 Sep 1887 28 Dec 1965
5. Ruth Craner 19 Jul 1891 9 Feb 1967
6. Joseph Howard Craner 16 Apr 1894 14 Apr 1932
7. Herbert Erastus Craner 19 Jan 1897 14 Feb 1957
8. Arthur Elden Craner 26 Aug 1899 28 May 1975
9. Annie May Craner 10 May 1902 10 Sep 1993
10. William Richard Craner 20 Aug 1905

 

They lived with George’s family through the spring of 1880. In February 1880, George’s mother passed away due to complications of childbirth, leaving seven children ages 7 to 22.
George and Mary Caroline moved to their own two room frame and plaster home later in the spring of 1880 in Tooele. Their first baby, Mary, was born 4 September 1880 in this home.
Arthur, Ruth, John, Emma, George Edward V, Annie, Howard
Mary, George IV, Mary Caroline, Herbert
William
The following year there was a big influx of people moving from Grantsville to Tooele. The Stake
President, President Frances M. Lyman, suggested that the people go to Oakley, Idaho as there was new land being opened up and it would be a great opportunity to make a permanent home. George and Mary decided this would be a great opportunity for them, so they sold out and Mary and the baby went to live with George’s family once again, and George, along with a couple of friends, left Tooele to check out the new country.
George purchased some land in Oakley and stayed through the summer to put up the crops. He returned to Tooele in October1881, to bring his family to their new home in Oakley. They packed up all their belongings–a stove, food, bedding, grain for the horses, one half dozen chairs, a nine by twelve rag rug. They had a good team and wagon to haul everything in and headed off to their new home. They started off in a one room log cabin, dirt floor at first but later replaced with wood. They made several improvements to their little cabin to make it comfortable. A second child, a son, George Edward, was born 20 November 1882.
The family got along fairly well with the house remodeled until the fall of 1884, when they needed a place to put their wheat crop of that year to keep it from the wet and cold. So the east end of the room in the house was selected for that purpose.
On April 6, 1885, Emma was born in this house. Now that the family was growing larger, and also because of the needed room for the wheat and oat crops, it was necessary for George to build a larger house for the family. So a two room log house was built about seventy-five yards away, and nearer to the street. Three months after Emma was born they were able to move into their new house. The old log house was now used for the granary and other valuables such as machinery, harness, etc. George had built corrals and stables, planted fruit trees as well as shade trees, built fences. He sold off part of his 160 acres, which he had homesteaded, to the town site to raise money to improve his farm.
On 27 September 1887, John was born in the new house.
In 1889 two additional rooms were added onto the log cabin. This new portion was made of brick. The inside was plastered and later papered. Two years later, Ruth was born 19 July 189l. It was in this home that five other children blessed their home, Joseph Howard, Herbert Erastus, Arthur Elden, Annie May, and William Richard.
During the years, more improvements were made to their home and property.
George was ordained a High Priest 22 Mar 1896 and was set apart as a High Councilor by Apostle Heber J. Grant. In 1901 George was ordained second councilor to Bishop Hector C. Haight.
In 1903, the farm life in Oakley was going fine. George and Mary had many of the modern conveniences, orchards, stables, stock of many kinds, cattle, horses, sheep, hogs, etc., several kinds of grain, potatoes, alfalfa, hay, plenty of water in the canal, which supplied East Oakley with water, which ran through the property. Nine children had been born, all living. George had bought more land to supplement that which was sold. Things were going well!
But, George was truly a great pioneer. Whenever there were new fields to be conquered or new territory to be settled, he was interested. He always had a great vision of the future before him. This is what happened when he heard about the Burley project. He wanted to be part of it.
So, in 1904 George filed on land in the Burley project. During the next couple of years he spent a lot of time between Oakley and Burley preparing for the move. He built a log home and dug a well, planted trees then moved to the Burley project in 1907 with Mary and his six youngest children. Later in 1911 he built a large two story yellow brick house. He was very enterprising as a dairyman, farmer, raised bees, chickens. He acquired more land in the Burley area and was a very successful businessman. He wanted to provide a heritage for his children.
George and Mary celebrated their 50th Wedding Anniversary, 23 July 1929 at their beautiful country home where all of their ten children, siblings, 31 grandchildren and two great grandchildren were present. It was a grand celebration!
George was always a hard working man, but during the last few years of his life, he had relaxed and let his son, Arthur, take over the main duties of the farm. He settled all his affairs amongst his children, and his death was very peaceful and apparently happy, as he just went to sleep. He died 19 August 1935 at his country home in Burley, Idaho. He was 77 years old. He was buried in the Pleasant View Cemetery in Burley, Idaho.

Sources: Family Group Sheets and histories, Beth Sorenson, 5311 Brush Creek Bay, West Valley City, Utah 84120
Craner History compiled by Herbert E. Craner, Jan. 1936

 

EMMA CRANER (1885-1971)
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Emma Craner was born April 6, 1885 at Oakley, Cassia, Idaho. She was the third of ten children and the second daughter born to George Craner and Mary Caroline Adams. Her older sister Mary was born Sept. 4, 1880 in Tooele, Utah. Emma was born in a log house; half of which was used for a grainery. Her older brother George Edward was born Nov. 20, 1882 in the same log house in Oakley. Three months after Emma was born the family moved into a new two-room log house which her father had built nearby and her birthplace was turned into a grainery.
Emma Craner
At first the family used both rooms of the new log house but as the fall months came with colder days and nights, it was too difficult to heat two rooms. Therefore, they decided to settle for the winter in the one south room which they could keep warmer. September 27, 1887 another brother, John Thomas was born in this home. During the early part of the summer of 1889, George and Mary Caroline decided to add two rooms on the west of the log cabin. This new portion was made of brick and finished inside with lumber, plastered and papered. Two years after this new portion was built, Ruth was born July 19, 1891. The new house now had four rooms; two made of logs and two made of brick. In this house the rest of the children were born: Joseph Howard–April 19, 1894, Herbert Erastus–January 19, 1897, Arthur Eldon–August 26, 1899, Annie May–May 10, 1902, and William Richard–August 20, 1905.
Emma attended school in a rock school house in Oakley, District #6. She attended the Cassia Stake Academy where she graduated from the eighth grade May 3, 1903. She didn’t attend school very much from then on because of illness. She suffered very much from headaches. She had scarlatina, measles and spotted fever when she was between the ages of thirteen and eighteen.
According to Emma’s brother Herbert, “Emma has always been self-sacrificing and has devoted her life to her husband and children. If there was ever a task to be performed, you could always rely on Emma doing it completely and thoroughly. She is of the retiring type, giving service to those about her and never encroaching on the rights of others. Whenever she was called upon to fill an executive position in the Church, she gave it her undivided attention and whole-hearted support. She made a host of friends in the community in which she lived. As the Master has said, ‘He, who would be the greatest among you, let him be the greatest servant to you.’ Such a person is Emma.”
In a tribute written by Emma’s oldest daughter Vera we read: “My mother Emma Craner Darrington was a quiet, unassuming person whose influence was felt by all who came in contact with her. Her life was one of service; service to her family, to her church, and to the community. Mother was one of those loyal, sincere, dedicated individuals who labor not with the thought of reward in mind but because of her love for the Gospel and her desire to be of service. She had a deep and abiding testimony of the truthfulness of the Gospel. I have heard my mother stand and bear her testimony many many times, and usually she would close it asking our Father in Heaven to help her endure to the end. She lived as she believed; a life dedicated in keeping the Lord’s commandments and doing good for her fellow men. She also had a lot of faith in the power of the Priesthood in administrating to the sick. She had secret and family prayers night and morning. She would pray several times a day for special things that needed her prayers.
“Mother was dependable to carry out her church assignments and do the things she was asked to do. She was a faithful visiting teacher in the Relief Society and held this position until her illness (near the end of her life) forced her to give it up. She was always so willing to furnish food for the Relief Society work days and for funerals. Mother was President of the Declo Primary for many years. She hooked up a team of horses to the white top buggy and drove and gathered all children Primary age up along the way, 3 ½ miles to attend Primary in Declo.
“Mother did a lot of compassionate service. In her neighborhood whenever there was a fire, illness, death, or new babies born, Mother did everything within her power to help. Mother and Aunt Mamie Darrington (her sister-in-law) often worked together when sickness and death came. Sometimes they would take turns if help was needed at night as well as day.
“Idleness had no place in her life. She was an excellent cook and she had plenty of opportunities to prove it; especially at haying and harvesting time. During the last few years before (My) father died, he required constant companionship. She was always by his side taking care of him. He died Sept. 2, 1970 in the Burley Hospital and was buried in the Declo Cemetery Sept. 5th. Mother died July 11, 1971 and was buried next to Father in the Declo Cemetery July 13, 1971.”

RUTH CRANER (1891 -1967)
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Ruth was born 19 July 1891 in Oakley, Cassia County, Idaho to George Craner and Mary Caroline Adams. She was the 5th child in a family of ten children (6 sons and 4 daughters).
Her school years were mostly spent in Oakley. While in Oakley she attended grade school in a two room rock building. Then she attended one year at Oakley High School, before moving to Burley on August 26, 1907. But there was no high school in Burley at that time, so she took music lessons from an Anna Clark and nurse training from Dr. Ellis R. Shipp.
Ruth and her family were members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and as a child her and her family attended the Oakley 1st Ward. Her father, George was a member of the Bishopric, with Hector C. Haight and David P. Thomas. As Ruth stated, “the Gospel was taught as well as lived in our home.”
They had many encounters with Indians while living in Oakley. Ruth and her brother Howard caught two Indian women stealing apples, so as a deterrent they decided to throw apples at them. Soon after, their mother and father came to their rescue and gave the women some apples. Ruth’s father always had plenty of grain, hay, fruit, honey, and meat, which, at times, he would trade the Indians for pine nuts or buckskin gloves.
When her family moved to Burley in 1907 they lived in a four room log house, but in 1911 they moved into a new cream colored brick home, located three miles East of Burley. It was the first brick home built in Burley.
She met her husband Clark Judd, while trying to help her father after his team of horses was frightened by a train. They ran away and she was asked to drive the other team, but got scared. After tying the team to a large pole she ran to the old school house to get her brother Howard. Clark offered his assistance and they arrived home safely.
Their courtship days were very pleasant ones. Arthur Clark Judd and Ruth Craner were married on 5 June 1913 in the Salt Lake LDS Temple.

Ruth and Clark were parents to eight children:

Name: Birth Date: Date of Death:
1. Clea Judd 5 August 1914
2. Arthur Craner Judd 12 September 1917 6 October 1996
3. Edward Gale Judd 9 November 1918
4. Ross Fuller Judd 5 November 1922 22 November 1944
5. Glenn Clark Judd 14 November 1924
6. Robert Sterling Judd 5 January 1927
7. Keith Judd 4 September 1929
8. Ruth Marie Judd 9 December 1934

Ruth and Clark lived on an 80 acre farm, later called Unity, which is where the first 3 children were born. In 1918, they purchased 40 acres at Beetville and lived there for 10 years and had their next 3 children. In March of 1929 they moved to Pella and that is where their last two children were born. Arthur Clark Judd died on 10 June 1966 at the age of 75. Ruth died less than a year later on 9 February 1967 at the age of 75.

 

WILLIAM RICHARD CRANER (1905 -2006)
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William was born 20 August 1905 in Oakley, Cassia, Idaho. He was the tenth child and sixth son of George and Mary Caroline Adams Craner. In 1904 Bill’s father along with his brother and brother–in-law Edward and David Harding went to Albion and filed on land in the new Burley project. George got 80 acres and David and Edward each got 40 acres. Between 1904 and 1907 a nice home was built in Burley. In 1911 George had a beautiful brick home built, not far from the other home. This house had a basement and an upstairs with three large bedrooms upstairs. In the house was built a “dumb waiter”, an elevator from the basement to the kitchen. Sounds fun, but not very handy and was not used very much. If you had to go to the basement to load, you might as well bring the stuff with you when you came back.
Their home in Burley was a gathering place for all their friends and relatives. But this was nice as we got to visit with the best in the LDS Church, even President Heber J. Grant.
Bill started school when he was six years old and right off he hated it. He started in the basement of the Miller School. He was transferred to a white building about three blocks to the north. A couple of years later he transferred back to the Miller School.
When he started High School we were still in World War I. The boys were required to wear kaki uniforms with wrap leggings. Bill graduated from high school in May 1923. That fall he enrolled at the Albion State Normal School. He graduated in 1925 with a certificate which allowed him to teach the intermediate grades.
Bill applied for a position as teacher in the Burley schools and he was hired to teach the 5th grade in the Miller building. He felt that two years of teaching 5th grade was enough of this and so in 1927 he enrolled in the school of agriculture at the University of Idaho in Moscow, Idaho. He worked as a hasher for about a year where he became the cook’s helper and worked in the kitchen.
During his last year of College he met a young lady from southern Idaho by the name of Grace Pond. She had attended Utah State Agricultural College for two years and had transferred to Idaho and entered the College of education. Bill graduated from the University in June 1930 and got a position at Sugar City, Idaho teaching vocational agriculture in high school. Grace graduated from the University in 1931 and on 18 June 1931 Bill and Grace were married in the Salt Lake LDS Temple.
In 1935 Bill applied and was accepted to teach vocational agriculture at Shelley, Idaho. In 1937 Mr. William Kerr (his boss) asked him to transfer to Moscow, Idaho, work for his Master’s degree and also teach in the high school. He finished school in 1939 and started looking for a job. He ended up starting a new department in Salmon, Idaho. He had a new car and so the coach, Golden Welch, asked him to haul basketball players. He took Grace with him and it was a choice experience for them. But Grace hated Salmon and was happy when they got a chance to move.
They moved to Preston, Idaho in June of 1940. Bill and Grace had one child.

Name: Birth Date: Death Date:

1. Carolyn Craner 7 Nov 1945

On 7 December 1941 the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor and we were at War. There was a call to produce food and more food to feed our soldiers. There was an opening in the Extension Service in Franklin County and some one suggested that Bill apply. He spent the next two years as agricultural agent for Franklin County, working with men, in the War effort. But somehow this was not for him and after two years he got a chance to go back to his old love, teaching the youth in vocational agriculture at Preston High School, and he stayed there until retiring in 1970.
He often took his students to the National FFA convention. He had boys place first 8 times; second 4 times and third 4 times over a 16 year period. He was the official judge of the crop exhibits at the Eastern Idaho State fair at Blackfoot for near 20 years. He served on many committees; such as the Chamber of Commerce, the Rotary Club, Civilian Defense, War Board and Farm Bureau. He was the president of the Idaho Vocational Education Association and was fortunate to be awarded an Honorary American Farmer degree. He was a charter member of the Preston Knife and Fork club, served five years on the board of directors and served one year as president. In 1969 he was listed in the book, Personalities of the West and Midwest.
Grace passed away 21 January 1977 in Logan, Utah. Bill married Bergetta “Birdie” Andrus Liechty 15 December 1977 in Ogden, Utah. Birdie died 24 February 1993 in Preston, Idaho. Bill celebrated his 100th Birthday on 20 August 2005 with an open house. He passed away 8 April 2006 in Preston, Idaho.

Source: History written by William R Craner. Edited by Jeri Ann Fogg

 

JOHN JENKINS CRANER (1860-1931)
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John was born 5 April 1860 in Tooele, Tooele, Utah. He was the second child and second son of twelve children born to George and Sarah Emma Jenkins Craner. He was baptized 19 April 1868 in Tooele. His father had provided well for his family and so as a young man, John was able to go to Provo, Utah to attend the Brigham Young College.
John Jenkins Craner
When John was 20 years old he met Emily Goodman of Provo. She is the daughter of John Richardson and Sarah Lee Goodman, Provo, Utah. She was born 20 January 1861. They were married 23 December 1880 in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City, Utah. The ceremony was performed by Daniel H. Wells. They lived in Provo until 1883 when they moved to Colton, Utah. They were engaged in cattle raising, hotel and general mercantile business. They owned the Craner and Marble Hotel and Store. He was also postmaster for a considerable length of time in Colton. It was said of the Craners: “No poor people ever went hungry or no sick room was ever forgotten by Mrs. Craner, who, being blessed with an abundance of wealth, contributed liberally to those in need.”
John and Emily were the parents to five children: (Four of their own and Martin McAvoy, who lost a twin sister and his mother at childbirth and his father at age six.)

Name: Birth Date: Death Date:
1. John Thomas Craner 6 Sep 1881 7 Aug 1926
2. George Edward Craner 3 Aug 1883 9 Dec 1887
3. Sarah Emily Craner (Sadie) 21 Oct 1884 27 Apr 1957
4. Martin McAvoy Craner b. 15 Mar 1894 27 Dec 1965


Martin McAvoy Craner (known as McAvoy) was born15 March 1894 in Price, Utah. He was the son of Martin and Sarah Jane Timbrel McAvoy. His mother died, 30 March 1894, soon after he was born. A twin sister, Martha McAvoy, was born and died on 15 Mar 1894. His parents had been married on 24 Jan 1893 in Provo, Utah. His father died 29 Oct 1901 from heart failure. Martin lived with John and Emily and assumed the “Craner” name.
They moved to Corinne, Utah in 1910 where they purchased a large farm and cattle ranch (The “model” farm). John took keen interest in all local affairs and served Box Elder county as commissioner for two terms. He was one of the original organizers of the Security Savings Bank of Brigham City and served as director. He also served as a director after the merger of the Security Savings Bank and the State Bank of Brigham City into the State Security Bank of Brigham City. In 1921, they moved to Brigham City.
John Thomas, John Jenkins, Emily
Sadie


They were both active members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. They were always active in the community wherever they lived. They were well liked by everyone. Emily died 17 January 1926 in Ogden, Utah. She was 65 years old. Her funeral services were held in Brigham City, although, she was buried in the Provo Cemetery.
John married Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Wagstaff Stubbs of Provo 14 Nov 1928. They moved to Provo and lived there up to the time of his death, 1931. He was one of the organizers of the Farmers State Bank of Provo and served as a director. He died 1 April 1931 at the Dee Hospital in Ogden following an operation of kidney trouble and high blood pressure, previously performed a week earlier. According to the obituary, John J. Craner was described as being “Prominent in Business and Livestock” His funeral services were held in the Brigham First Ward. There were services held in Provo also. He was buried by his first wife, Emily, in the Provo Cemetery. He was 71 years old.

Craner Hotel and the Craner and Marble Store in Colton, Utah
Sources: Family Group Sheets, Naomi Lowe, 607 Holiday Drive, Brigham City, Utah 84302
Obituaries in Local Newspapers
History, Mary Ethel Craner Veibell

 

JOHN THOMAS CRANER (1881 – 1926)
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John Thomas “Tom” Craner was born 16 September 1881 in Tooele, Utah. Tom was the son of John Jenkins and Emily Goodwin Craner. It was in Colton, Utah that Tom met Martha Lovenia Jensen. Lovenia was born on 2 Feb 1880 in Fairview, Utah, a daughter of Peter Christen Christensen (Jensen) and Martha Ann Howell Jensen. Lovenia was reared and educated in Fairview, Utah. She found employment at the Craner and Marble Hotel and Store in Colton, Utah, where she and Tom met and fell in love. They were married on 24 Dec 1904 in Provo, Utah, and lived in Colton, Utah.

In 1910 John Jenkins Craner negotiated the purchase of the Model Farm, a few miles west of Corinne, Utah. The family realized that the mining and lumber business which supported them in Colton was coming to an end. John and Emily and their children, John Thomas and Lovenia Craner, and Hyrum Lyman and Sadie Craner Marble, along with the grandchildren, moved to West Corinne. A new stone home was built across the street from the original farm house (which is still there in 2004). An upstairs was built in the home for John and Emily, and Sadie and Lyman and their family moved into the downstairs. Tom and Lovenia and their family remained in the original farm house.

Tom and Lovenia were the parents of six children:
Name: Birth Date: Death Date:
John Christian Craner 11 Feb. 1906 24 Jul 1978
Ernest Leon Craner 23 Mar 1908
Allie Craner 6 Apr. 1912 24 Apr 1976
Roy Lewis Craner 17 Nov 1913 22 Mar 1967
Willis Dean Craner 10 Dec 1915
Joseph Edward Craner 30 Jun 1917 10 Mar 1931
George Thomas Craner 14 Jan 1919 27 Dec 1954

Tom died 7 August 1926 in Ogden, Utah and Lovenia died 10 January 1961 in Brigham City, Utah.
Willis, Roy and John Craner
With prize Hampshire Buck on the farm in Corinne

 

ELIZA ELIZABETH CRANER (1862-1941)
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Eliza Elizabeth Craner was born in Tooele, Tooele County, Utah on 6 March 1862 to George Craner and Sarah Emma Jenkins. Eliza was named after her grandmothers, Hannah Eliza Barber Jenkins and Elizabeth West Craner. She was the 3rd child in a family of 12 children.
Eliza Elizabeth
Craner
As a child, Eliza did not have much schooling, but did attend a school in Tooele. There were few books and the writing and figuring was done on slates. Also, she learned to milks cows, make butter, make beet molasses, and helped to care for her father’s bees and honey.
Eliza was married at the age of 18 years old to John Bowen. Eliza was a bride of Testimony. Eliza became the 2nd wife to John in a polygamous marriage arrangement. John was 39 years old, a native of Abersychan, Monmouth, Wales, who emigrated in 1862. John was counseled through a Patriarchal blessing to...”Take unto thy self wives,” when he was nearly 33 years of age. John had married Hannah Johnson in the Endowment House on 2 Jan 1877. At the time of John and Eliza’s marriage on 28 October 1880 in the Endowment House, John and Hannah had two children. Eliza continued to live with her father for a period of time since her mother had died shortly after childbirth in February of 1880. It is not know how long this arrangement continued, but Eliza made a home for her father as well for her own little family until about 1886.

Eliza was a wife who knew sacrifice. On July 16, 1885, John was arrested by Federal agents for Unlawful Cohabitation. He was tried and sentenced on February 17, 1886 and then served a 6 month sentence in the Utah State Penitentiary until August 20, 1886.
Eliza was a mother of fortitude an industry. In late 1888, or early in 1889, Eliza and her family had to go in “the underground.” Eliza took her three small children and moved to West Jordan, Utah. Two more children were born in this area. The family then moved into Midvale and then into Salt Lake City where another daughter was born in 1896. The children never went to the same school for more than a year or two as the family was forced to move about, so they would not become too well known. To help with the anonymity, the family took the name of Brown.
Eliza had a testimony of “the Principle,” and through her sacrifice, she became a stronger person to lead and direct her family in the paths of right. Her son, Lewis, said that his mother was a saint. He never heard her complain about the pressures of Polygamy. Early in 1898, the family was permitted to return to Tooele. “Aunt Hannah’s” family lived on one corner and Eliza’s family lived on the other corner of the block. The crops of the farm were divided equally between the two families and all children were expected to work for the good of all. Four more children were born in Tooele.

Eliza and John were the parents to eleven children:
John Bowen
Name Birth Date Date of Death
1. Sarah Emma Bowen 19 Feb 1882 5 Feb 1886
2. Lewis John Bowen 16 Apr 1883 17 Nov 1971
3. George Benjamin Bowen 20 Jun 1885 1 Dec 1957
4. Eliza Craner Bowen 20 Aug 1888 12 May 1943
5. Rossil Craner Bowen 31 Oct 1890 8 Jan 1988
6. Maleta Craner Bowen 8 Sep 1892 29 Dec 1975
7. Ethel Craner Bowen 4 Mar 1896 8 Nov 1966
8. Homer Willard Bowen 7 May 1898 11 Oct 1971
9. Wells Craner Bowen 1 Jan 1900 6 Jun 1970
10. Lucy Craner Bowen 17 Jan 1903 12 Nov 1990
11. Myra Jennette Bowen 29 May 1905 29 Dec 1977
Eliza had learned the practice of nursing and became a Practical Nurse soon after she returned to Tooele. She performed all types of nursing care throughout Tooele county and assisted Drs. J.A. Phipps, J.H. Peck, and T.M. Aldous in home deliveries of babies. She helped deliver over 200 babies during this time of service which lasted until her health began to fail when she was 73 years old. Eliza was a woman of service.
Hannah Johnson Bowen filed for a civil divorce from John Bowen on September 27, 1908. Eliza and John were subsequently married civilly, by the laws of the state shortly after that. John died in Tooele, Utah on 20 September 1922 and was buried in that community. Eliza died in Tooele on 12 June 1941 at the age of 79. She is buried beside her husband, John Bowen, as is her “sister” in polygamy, Hannah Johnson Bowen.

1958 50th Wedding Anniversary of Lewis John & Adelaide Bowen
Ella, Ruth, Ray, Lucy
Merlin, Lewis John, Adelaide, Lewis April 1977 after death of Adelaide
David & Lucy Forsberg, LaVal & Ella Clerser, Merlin & Donna May
Sources:
Book: Lewis John Bowen and Adelaide Hone, “Together Forever”, compiled and edited by Merlin John Bowen, May 1996
History: History of Eliza Craner Bowen, by Maleta Bowen Hansen. Read at the Meeting of the Martha Warburton Camp, D.U.P., Mar 25, 1938
History: Verbal comments of Eliza Elizabeth Bowen by Lewis J. Bowen, son, prior to his death to Addie L. F. Stevens Family Group Sheets: George Craner and Sarah Emma Jenkins, John Bowen and Eliza Elizabeth Craner, in poss. of Addie L. F. Stevens

EDWARD CRANER (1864-1882)
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Edward (Ted) was born 20 April 1864 in Tooele, Tooele, Utah. He was the fourth child of twelve born to George and Sarah Emma Jenkins Craner. He was their third son. He spent his youth working and enjoying his family on the Craner farm in Tooele. He lost his mother when he was nearly sixteen.
According to the Craner records, Edward lost his life 18 October 1882 at the age of eighteen. There is no other information on Edward as to the cause of his death.
Edward Craner
Sources: Family Group Sheets, Naomi Lowe, 607 Holiday Drive, Brigham City, Utah 84302
Craner History, compiled by Herbert E. Craner, 1936

 

EMMA CRANER (1865-1867)
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Emma was born 20 September 1865 in Tooele, Tooele, Utah. She was the fifth child of twelve born to George and Sarah Emma Jenkins Craner.
She died as a young child of fifteen months, 6 January 1867 in Tooele, Utah.
Sources: Family Group Sheets, Naomi Lowe, 607 Holiday Drive, Brigham City, Utah 84302

JOSEPH CRANER (1867-1891)
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Joseph was born 15 November 1867 in Tooele, Tooele, Utah. He was the sixth child of twelve children born to George and Sarah Emma Jenkins Craner. He was the fourth son born into the family. When he was just twelve, his mother died in childbirth, leaving seven of the twelve children. He worked on the family farm along with his father and his brothers, George, John Jenkins and Edward. He attended school in Tooele. He must have had further schooling as he entered the profession as a teacher. He lived most of his life in Tooele.
Joseph Craner
During the summer of 1891, when Joseph was 23, he had some stock that were ranging in the Gentile Valley and he went there to live temporarily. On July 3, in the afternoon around 4 o’clock, Joseph and five other friends decided to go “bathing” in a large warm spring on the Eldredge farm, a short distance from where he was living. “Amid laughter and harmless jokes, they entered the water together. The stream, or pool was shallow near the edge but was very deep in the center. All went well until deep water was reached, when young Craner sank suddenly out of sight, throwing up his hands as he did so. At first it was supposed that he had simply dived to the bottom on his own volition. This idea was, however, quickly dispelled when he was observed to rise to the surface with an expression of agony on his face. A desperate and determined effort was made to save him, but he again went down to rise no more in life. His companions being excellent divers, went to the bottom time and again in search of his body, but were unable to definitely locate it.” (Journal History 1891, July 4, Page 3) Eighteen hours later the body was located and immediate interment was necessary.
This accident was devastating to his father, George. He traveled to Gentile Valley by the Union Pacific Railroad. When George arrived, Joseph had already been buried for several hours. He decided to leave the body there and planned to return the next year to “bring my poor boy home and place him in the family burying ground with his mother and others of my departed children” in the Tooele Cemetery.
Joseph died 3 July 1891 at the age of 23. He had never married. He was greatly respected by all who knew him.
Sources: Family Group Sheets, Naomi Lowe, 607 Holiday Drive, Brigham City, Utah 84302
Craner History, compiled by Herbert E. Craner, 1936
Deseret Evening News, 7 July 1891

 

MARY ANN CRANER (1870-1947)
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Mary Ann Craner
Mary Ann Craner was born 25 March 1870 in Tooele, Tooele, Utah. She was the seventh child of twelve children born to George and Sarah Emma Jenkins Craner. Only four of the children, George, John Jenkins, Eliza Elizabeth, and Mary Ann married and had children. Her mother died 14 February 1880 in childbirth, when Mary Ann was 9½ years old, leaving seven children: four older brothers, (George, John Jenkins, Edward, Joseph), one older sister, (Eliza Elizabeth), and one younger sister, (Harriett). In November, 1880, she lost her little sister, Harriett, (age 8). Two years later, in 1882, she lost her brother, Edward, (age 18). Another brother, Joseph,(age 23) died later in a drowning accident in 1891.

George and his new wife, Mary, lived with the family until spring of 1880. Then, Eliza, age 18, took over the household duties. Even after Eliza married in Oct of 1880, she still lived with them for several years to care for the family. Then it became Mary Ann’s responsibility to take over. Her father, George Craner, was a strict, precise and meticulous person, so everything had to be taken care of just right. He was a member of the Stake High Council, a member of the Bishopric and various other church and civic positions, so when the visiting authorities came from Salt Lake City, he would bring them to his home for lodging and food, which meant that Mary Ann always had to have everything in order. They had a large house to keep clean and lots of cooking to be done. She attended school a few months each year. Her father was a prosperous man and provided well for his family.
Joseph Owen Dunn
Mary Ann’s courtship with Joseph Owen Dunn was over a period of five years. The Dunn Family also lived in Tooele, before and after moving to Bountiful, Lake Town, Brigham City, and Stockton for several years then back to Tooele. Mary Ann’s father wouldn’t give his consent to marriage until she was old enough. When Mary Ann was twenty and Joseph was twenty-two, they were married 24 September 1890 in the Logan Temple. The long trip was made with horse and buggy and of course, Mary Ann’s father, George Craner came along as a chaperone. Their first home was in Tooele in the George Craner home. They lived with him and cared for him until Joseph and Mary Ann had five children. Joseph then made the bricks and built a home that they lived in until they moved to Corinne, Utah in 1911. Mary Ann was very proud of her home. They had plenty of room for horses, cows, pigs, chickens and a very large garden and orchard. They had a small farm east of the cemetery.
Mary Ann and Joseph were the parents of ten children:

Name Birth Date Death Date

1. Owen Clifford Dunn 5 Jul 1891 23 Jun 1943
2. Emma Dunn 6 Aug 1893 15 Nov 1963
3. Gertrude Dunn 26 Sep 1895 10 Jan 1974
4. Ruby Dunn 6 Feb 1897 16 Feb 1897
5. Emile Craner Dunn 24 Nov 1898 4 Aug 1989
6. Sadie Marie Dunn 18 Nov 1902 12 Nov 1995
7. Mary Leona Dunn 14 Jun 1905 20 Oct 1992
8. John Edgar Dunn 10 Aug 1908 13 Jun 1985
9. Annis Elizabeth Dunn 13 Sep 1911 22 May 1995
10. Seth Arnold Dunn 1 Dec 1918 20 Aug 1984

In 1908, an ore smelter was built east of town, where many men and boys were employed, among them Greeks, Mexicans, Frenchmen, etc. Mary Ann had roomers and boarders for some time. Emma (age 15) had a job at Tate’s Store and was so proud to have some money to spend and to share. It was at this time that the environment in Tooele changed and they felt it wasn’t a good place to raise their family. Mary Ann’s brother, John Jenkins, had a farm in Corinne and convinced them to move there. Several years later in 1911, they established a new home in Corinne. Emma and Gertrude were especially saddened to leave their friends in Tooele. Mary Ann also was sad to leave her nice home and surroundings in Tooele.
There were no church organizations to attend and not enough families living there to organize any in Corinne so they went to Fruitvale for Sunday School and Bear River City for Sacrament Meeting, which meant that they didn’t go often.
In 1912 a Relief Society was organized in Corinne and Mary Ann was called to be the President. This was done before the ward was organized in Corinne 22 November 1914 by President Joseph F. Smith. Bishop Alma Jensen was called as Bishop with Joseph A Packer as first counselor and Joseph Owen Dunn as second counselor.
In 1920, Bishop Alma Jensen was released and Bishop Abraham Evans was sustained as Bishop with Joseph Owen Dunn as first counselor and Edwin Gilbert as second counselor. They held these positions until 1931.
The Corinne Relief Society was organized 27 September 1915. Mary Ann was selected as President and served for twenty years as President of the Corinne Relief Society. One of her mottos was, “Anything worth doing at all was worth doing well.” Soon after she was called, the ward had their Relief Society Birthday Celebration, 17 March 1916. Sister Emeline B. Wells, the General President of the Relief Society, came. Many preparations had been made. “At that time Mary Ann’s health was poorly, and Sister Wells promised her that if she would do her duty, the Lord would bless her, and I’m sure she was blessed for it.” (Sadie Dunn Jensen)
In her Relief Society activities, she was involved in sewing projects during World War I to help the Red Cross, fund raising projects, auctions, as well as charity acts of service in sorrow, sickness and death.
Their family was one of the few families to have a phone, so many people came to use it. When a doctor was called and he needed assistance, Mary Ann would often be asked to help, especially in maternity cases.
“Mother would gather up a little sack of clean clothes, a roll of cotton, the Lysol bottle, the olive oil, maybe a sheet or two (and oh, yes, the bed pan) and be on her way. The bed pan was surely a luxury that traveled all over the community. Later the Relief Society had a maternity bundle, which was always kept ready in case of emergency.” (Sadie Dunn Jensen)
Joseph was always willing for Mary Ann to go and do her duty and provided a horse and buggy for her use, or sometimes he would take her himself. Surely his love for the gospel and his kindness and love for Mary Ann helped her accomplish the many things that she did. Following is a story written by Katie J. Nelson, a friend of Mary Ann’s, called “The Least of These”.

“The Least of These”
It was early spring. The alkali mud stuck to the wheels of the buggy and halfway on the horse’s legs. It was a one horse shay affair, but looked as if a team of horses were needed to make the grade.
“Git up there Bally!! Faster, hurry, faster.” Evidently, there was no time to lose. A short built, middle-aged man spoke to his horse as he laboriously jogged through the mud. “Git up, git up!” The lines slapped over the animal’s back as their destination came to view. It was a farm house set back from the road.
He jumped from the vehicle, tied old Bally to a post and started toward the path that led to the little brown house. That path holds many fond memories. Here sweet-peas had flaunted their beauty and fragrance to many passerbys. Numberless bouquets had been given to neighbors and friends. She was noted for her love for flowers, but not so much as for her care and devotion to the sick and afflicted of the farming community–regardless of color or creed. She had indeed followed the admonition of Christ, “......Inasmuch as ye do it unto the least of these, ye have done it unto me.”
He knocked rather reluctantly on the door. A feeling of intrusion came over him. He had no right to ask her to come tonight—the storm, the mud.....no! And then, the agonizing moans for help spurred him on. Well, hadn’t she been helping others? Hadn’t she done things of this sort since he had known her? She had been president of the Relief Society for over fifteen years and had become known for her charity and care of the sick. The door opened. She smiled. She always smiled in the same sympathetic understanding way.
She bade him enter. The home, where so many problems had been solved, so many happy hours spent, was immaculate and nice to look at. He looked at her almost pleadingly, and said, “You come? My wife, she very sick. I don’t know what to do. You come with me please?”
In her calm, assuring tone, she answered, “Of course I’ll come.” Then aside to her husband, “Shall I go with him?” He replied, “I think I had better take you. You might need some help.”
Very hurriedly, she gathered the things she thought she might need, while her husband hitched the horses to the buggy.
Traveling with the team was much faster than that of the one-horse shay, so before long they came to the shack from whence the torturous cries of pain proceeded. With the deftness of one who understands the situation, and a prayer in her heart, she put forth her best efforts.
Soon the pain of anguish subsided and with the help of her husband, a little black-haired, olive skinned baby was born, as the father entered the door.”

In September of 1930, a hand carved chest was made and certain documents, photographs, stories, etc were written by each Relief Society President of the Box Elder Stake and placed in the chest and locked up to be opened in fifty years or 1980. At the ceremony, Mary Ann was called to bear her testimony. Her written testimony was included in the chest.
In 1934, they sold the farm and moved to Logan into a new home and were very comfortable and happy for a few years, going to the temple, doing a service they both loved very much. They always had beautiful flower and vegetable gardens. They were delighted to be able to take clean, washed vegetables to all the neighbors. They made many friends, both young and old while they lived there.
They celebrated their Fiftieth Wedding Anniversary in September 1940 at the home of Sadie and Pat Jensen in Brigham City. Many friends and relatives called during the day from Corinne, Logan, Brigham, Salt Lake City, Tooele, Utah, and Burley, Idaho.
Mary Ann passed away 3 April 1947 in Logan, Cache, Utah. She was buried in the Tooele Cemetery. She was 77 years old. Joseph passed away just a few months later, 20 September 1947 in Ogden, Weber, Utah and was also buried in the Tooele Cemetery. He was 79 years old.
Sources: Family Group Sheets and histories, Naomi Lowe, 607 Holiday Drive, Brigham City, Utah 84302
Histories written by Sadie Dunn Jensen

OWEN CLIFFORD DUNN (1891 – 1943)
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Owen was born July 5, 1891 in Tooele, Utah. He was the oldest of ten children born to Joseph Owen and Mary Ann Craner Dunn. He worked at the smelter in Tooele for his livelihood. He was an active member of the LDS church always fulfilling his callings with honor.
Owen married Emma Eulalia Mortensen December 23, 1914 in the Salt Lake LDS Temple. They are the parents of five children: Clifford Vernor, Joseph Stanley, Emma Cleofa, Mary Lavone, and Kenneth Mortensen.
Owen died June 23, 1943 in Salt Lake City, Utah. He was buried June 27, 1943 in Tooele, Utah.

EMMA DUNN (1893 – 1963)
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Emma was born August 6, 1893 in Tooele, Utah. She was the second of ten children and the first daughter born to Joseph Owen and Mary Ann Craner Dunn.
Emma married Frederick Leon Eliason September 3, 1913 in the Logan Temple. Rumor has it the couple eloped to the temple. They were the parents of seven children: Elden Leon, Eloise, Floyd Dunn, Irma, Norma, Owen Frederick, and Naomi.
Emma was a quiet, kind, and gentle person, always sharing what she had baked or grown in the garden. She loved to work in the garden and watch things grow; she always worked so hard. Times were difficult and her illness such a hardship and yet she showed unlimited love and devotion to her family as long as she was able to do so. “Emma D” was a woman strong in character, gifted in music, loving and caring, patient in her suffering and beloved by her family.
Emma died November 15, 1963 in Brigham City, Utah. She was buried November 18, 1963 in Brigham City, Utah.

GERTRUDE DUNN (1895 – 1974)
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Gertrude Dunn was born September 26, 1895 in Tooele, Utah. She was the third of ten children and the second daughter born to Joseph Owen and Mary Ann Craner Dunn.
Gertrude married Emery David Hewlett February 28, 1917 in the Salt Lake Temple. They were the parents of seven children: Wanda, Lamar, Lowell Craner, Afton Lorraine, Robert Claron, Donna Marie, and Bonnie Jean.
In her younger years, Gertrude worked very hard on a huge farm called the “Model Farm.” she helped with all the cooking, cleaning and all the women’s chores.
Gertrude was never one to “put on” or try to be something that she wasn’t. Material things did not matter to her. She always felt she was so blessed with what she had and was so very thankful for her family and their good health. However, she was a beautiful lady with long auburn hair. She loved to dress nice and would never think of going to town without her gloves and hat. She was pretty classy in her younger years.
In the late 1920's Gertrude and Emery moved their family to Twin Falls, Idaho. Emery often traveled with his work and Gertrude went along as often as she could. She also enjoyed going with him on hunting trips. She would sit in the car with her young children and crochet or embroidery while she waited for him.
Gertrude’s home was a moderate, humble little home which was always immaculate. She had it fixed so cute and comfortable as she loved fixing little arrangements and had many knick knacks. She loved to have visitors and everyone was always so welcome in her home. She was quite a talker and was interesting to talk to. She made friends with everyone. She loved working in her yard. She always had beautiful roses. She loved to pick one single rose bud and usually had one in a bud vase in her front room.
Gertrude loved birds and raised canaries. One called Dickie lived a long time. He loved Gertrude and would do tricks for her. He was a lot of company for her in her later years after her husband had passed away.
Gertrude loved her family. Her grandchildren loved to visit her in her cozy little home where she would entertain them with stories from her youth and years as a newlywed. Their visits almost always ended with a sugar cookie from her cookie bin. They all considered her the perfect Grandma who loved her kids and showed it in every way.
Gertrude Dunn Hewlett died January 10, 1974 in Twin Falls, Idaho. She was buried January 12, 1974 in Twin Falls.

 

RUBY DUNN (1897 – 1897)
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Ruby Dunn, the fourth child and third daughter of Joseph Owen and Mary Ann Craner Dunn, was born and died on February 6, 1897.

 

EMILE CRANER DUNN (1898 – 1989)
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Emile Craner Dunn was born November 24, 1898 in Tooele, Utah. He was the fifth child and the second son born to Joseph Owen and Mary Ann Craner Dunn. He used to say that he was born in “a brand new house with the plaster still wet.” He spent his first years herding cows up the canyon. In 1910 the family moved to Corinne, Utah.
In 1919 Emile worked on the railroad section going between Grandview and Yakima. While there, he received a mission call to the southern states. He requested to go to Tonga instead and his request was granted. He served as a missionary in Tonga for four years. While he was there, he taught school and preached the gospel. When David O’McKay was in Tonga during his world tour 1921-23, Elder Dunn impressed him to the point that they were friends for the rest of Elder McKay’s life.
In 1926, Evelyn Hyde went to Corinne to teach school and on August 15, 1928, she became Mrs. Emile C. Dunn in the Salt Lake Temple. The newlyweds set up housekeeping in Logan, Utah where Emile worked for George Bowen (a cousin) at the Cache Valley Commission Company. He did all of the miscellaneous jobs such as delivering feed and “icing Norman.” He eventually had the biggest wholesale candy sales route in Cache Valley by being willing to sell candy by the bar rather than by the box only.
Emile and Evelyn were the parents of three children: Emile Hyde, Karen, and Ofa.
In late 1935 Emile was called to be mission president in Tonga. The family left for Tonga in January 1936 and arrived in Nukualofa, Tonga on March 13. For the next ten years, Emile had a great responsibility of leading the mission. He began by building and fixing up some homes and chapels. An important project of these years was the translation of the Book of Mormon into the Tongan language. When all of the missionaries were sent home before the war broke out in the Pacific, Emile called native men and their wives to fill in the gaps. This began a great spiritual upswing as the Saints learned to lead and govern each other.
With the coming of the war came changes for the family. Evelyn and their children were sent to New Zealand by the government. They lived in the mission home there with Matthew Cowley and his family for about 13 months. Emile was drafted by the army to build warehouses and storage sheds for the armed forces. His knowledge of the people and language was just what was needed at this time. He had to move out of the Mission Home so that the General and his staff could us it for headquarters. He lived in the chapel since there was no church services held there for a while.
With the end of the war in 1945, the family was able to return to the United States. It was a short stay because in 1947 Emile was again called to go to Tonga to build the Liahona College and was later called as Mission President there again.
In 1950 the family moved back to Utah and life continued on. Emile worked at the Utah State University in the Maintenance Department. In 1952 he was called as an officiator in the Logan Temple. Emile retired from the USU in 1966. Soon thereafter, he and Evelyn were called to serve a mission in New Zealand. They spent two years there. Back to Logan for one year, then a call to the England South Mission. A year home again then back to England Temple Mission. Home once more for a year then another call to the Rarotonga’s this time under the French Polynesian (Tahitian) Mission. All the time between these missions they had been Temple Workers in the Logan Temple.
Emile died August 4, 1989 in Brigham City, Utah. He was buried August 9, 1989 in Logan, Utah.

 

SADIE MARIE DUNN (1902 – 1995)
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Sadie Marie Dunn was born November 18, 1902 at Tooele, Utah. She was the sixth child and fourth daughter of Joseph Owen and Mary Ann Craner Dunn. She married Parley William Jensen November 6, 1930 at Logan, Utah. They were the parents of three children: D’On Marie, Patricia Ann and Newell William. Sadie’s first husband died August 2, 1968. Sadie married Clarence Jim Hewlett May 2, 1978 at Ogden, Utah.
Sadie was a gracious and lovely lady. Her honor, virtue, wisdom, soul, thoughtfulness, dependability, consideration, disposition, ambition, and neatness all made her a complete delight to be around and loved dearly by all who knew her. She had great love for all people especially her parents, brothers and sisters, husband, children and grandchildren. She taught love in the home by example, through kind words and thoughtful actions. Her life of hard work, sacrifice for her children, service to others and tender expressions of love to her posterity spoke most profoundly of her virtues. She had a deep and abiding testimony of the restored gospel of our Savior and was an exemplary Mother in Zion.
Sadie died November 12, 1995 in Ogden, Utah. She was buried November 15, 1995 in Brigham City, Utah.

 

MARY LEONA DUNN (1905 – 1992)
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Mary Leona Dunn was born June 14, 1905 at Tooele, Utah. She was the seventh child and fifth daughter of Joseph Owen and Mary Ann Craner Dunn. Twenty-two years later, she married Benjamin McCarrey Doty in the Logan Temple on June 15, 1927. They lived for a couple of years in Provo, Utah while finishing college. They moved to Honolulu, Hawaii where they were employed as teachers in the public schools. Ben taught high school band and music while Leona was teaching in the junior high school. Ben was also employed by radio station KGO as a news announcer. It was shortly after the attack of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 that the family moved to Los Angeles, California where they lived most of their lives. Ben was employed as a radio engineer at American Broadcasting Co., managed the radio engineer’s union, and later worked in the technical management of National Broadcasting Co. television. Leona worked for many years at the University of Southern California in the Bulletin Mailing Department.
Leona and Ben are the parents of three children: George Richard, Donald Benjamin, and Mary Ann.
Leona has always been a devoted member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. She spent over 20 years teaching three-year old children in Junior Sunday School.
Those who knew Leona well loved her and admired her as a lady who was always kind and gracious. She had a pleasant word for everyone and rarely raised her voice. She was a loving and patient person who devoted her life to her husband and children. Her manner of discipline was by way of expectation and encouragement rather than force. She kept a very neat home, cooked tasty and wholesome food and mastered all the skill of homemaking. While patiently conforming to the desires of those around her, Leona was at the same time capable of great independence and would do for herself rather than inconvenience anyone. In conversations she was a listener and a great supporter yet had many good ideas of her own which she would share when asked. She was very pleasant to be around.
Leona died October 20, 1992 in Salt Lake City, Utah. She was buried October 23, 1992 also in Salt Lake City, Utah.

 

JOHN EDGAR DUNN (1908 – 1985)
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John Edgar Dunn was born August 10, 1908 at Tooele, Utah. He was the eighth child and third son of Joseph Owen and Mary Ann Craner Dunn. He married Mary Marcell Stewart September 11, 1929 in the Salt Lake Temple. They are the parents of three children: Mary Luana, Alan Edgar, and Kathryn Joy.
Edgar and Marcell spent their early years of marriage living on a farm in Corinne, Utah. Edgar loved Corinne and the farm and would have been happy to stay there if he could have made a living. However, the depression years were tough and circumstances made it impossible to remain. As the children were growing up, they moved around quite a bit but wherever they were living they had a nice comfortable home, kept clean and homey by Marcell. A favorite home was in Salt Lake City. It was a large home surrounded by beautiful grounds with a stream flowing through the yard and a fishpond which Edgar kept filled with large goldfish. Edgar was able to use his farming skills again in growing a large garden and raising chickens.
During their later years, Edgar and Marcell spent many happy times with their children; always being a great source of strength and always there to help out when they were needed. They taught their children the value and enjoyment of work. They always worked hard but enjoyed what they were doing.
Edgar died June 13, 1985 in Salt Lake City, Utah. He was buried June 17, 1985 also in Salt Lake City.

 

ANNIS ELIZABETH DUNN (1911 – 1995)
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Annis Elizabeth Dunn was born September 13, 1911 at Corinne, Utah. She was the ninth child and sixth daughter of Joseph Owen and Mary Ann Craner Dunn. She married Roscoe Rowland Bevan June 15, 1935 at Ogden, Utah. They were the parents of four children: Dorthy Joan, Michael R., Mary Judith and George Richard.
Annis Elizabeth enjoyed spending time with her children, reading to them and playing with them. She always made Christmas special, gathering family around her and helping them enjoy being together. She taught her children great things without any psychology books. She was understanding but firm with her children. She was always very interested in seeing that school work was done properly; especially English. She was always concerned about the well being of her family and others around her. She taught her children in numerous ways through word and example.
Annis Elizabeth dies May 22, 1995 at Twin Falls, Idaho. She was buried May 30, 1995 also in Twin Falls.

 

SETH ARNOLD DUNN (1918 – 1984)
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Seth Arnold Dunn was born December 1, 1918 at Brigham City, Utah. He was the last of ten children born to Joseph Owen and Mary Ann Craner Dunn. He married Radah Matthews August 14, 1939 at Providence, Utah. They were the parents of three children: Lonnie Seth, Dennis Eugene, and David Brent.
Seth was always the teacher to his children. Whenever he spoke to his children it seemed there was a lesson to be learned. He was a tall man with black hair and a deep voice. He worked as a milk delivery man and had his oldest son work with him during his teenage years. Seth taught his children to do the best they could at whatever they attempted as they learned to provide for their family. They didn’t know how to live another way of life.
Seth never had an enemy. Everybody was his friend and he always had time to help out. When he was called on by his friends to be Mayor of Weiser, he didn’t really want to do it. He just wanted to retire and go fishing but the pressure was on and he didn’t let them down. The hardest thing for Seth as Mayor was with every decision he had to make he found adversaries. This bothered him a lot because he liked everyone.
A great love for Seth was the Fiddle Festival which is held in Weiser every year. One year her was honored as the Fiddle Festival was dedicated to him. He was also named “Distinguished Citizen of Washington County” and honored by Idaho’s largest newspaper as one of Idaho’s distinguished people. Seth didn’t seek notoriety but served because that was the way he lived. He always told his children to live by the golden rule, “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you” and he always did.
Seth died August 20, 1984 at Weiser, Idaho. He was buried August 25, 1984 also at Weiser, Idaho.

 

HARRIETT CRANER (1872-1880)
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Harriett was born 1 July 1872 in Tooele, Tooele, Utah. She was the eighth child and fourth daughter of twelve children born to George and Sarah Emma Jenkins Craner. During her short life she had four more sisters born into the family that died in childbirth or shortly thereafter. She lost her mother in February of 1880 when her last sister, Clara, was born. She was only seven years old.
She was baptized 1 July 1880 on her eighth birthday by John A. Bevan and was confirmed by her father, George Craner on that same day. What a joyous occasion that must have been for her and her family!
Later that same year on 14 November 1880, she was called home...to her eternal home to be with her Mother and other siblings. Harriett was only eight years old when she died. She is buried in the Tooele Cemetery along with other family members..
Sources: Family Group Sheets, Naomi Lowe, 607 Holiday Drive, Brigham City, Utah 84302
Tooele City Cemetery Records, Tooele, Utah FHL, Film 1,036,712
Tooele Ward Records, FHL, Film 0027,367

 

MARTHA JANE CRANER (1875-1875)
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Martha was born 2 June 1875 in Tooele, Tooele, Utah. She was the ninth of twelve children born to George and Sarah Emma Jenkins Craner. She also died that same day, 2 June 1875.
Sources: Family Group Sheets, Naomi Lowe, 607 Holiday Avenue, Brigham City, Utah 84302

 

SARAH PAMELIA CRANER (1876-1877)
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Sarah was born 14 September 1876 in Tooele, Tooele, Utah. She was the tenth of twelve children born to George and Sarah Emma Jenkins Craner. She only lived to be about five months old. She died 4 Feb 1877.
Sources: Family Group Sheets, Naomi Lowe, 607 Holiday Avenue, Brigham City, Utah 84302
Tooele Cemetery Records, Tooele, Utah FHL Film 1,036,712

 

EMELINE B. CRANER (1878-1878)
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Emeline was born 24 February 1878. She was the eleventh child of twelve children born to George and Sarah Emma Jenkins Craner. She only lived to be about five months old. She died 23 July 1878.
Sources: Family Group Sheets, Naomi Lowe, 607 Holiday Drive, Brigham City, Utah 84302
Tooele Cemetery Records, Tooele, Utah

 

CLARA AGNES CRANER (1880-1880)
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Clara was born 12 February 1880. She was the twelfth child of twelve children born to George and Sarah Emma Jenkins Craner. She died the same day, 12 February 1880.
Sources: Family Group Sheets, Naomi Lowe, 607 Holiday Drive, Brigham City, Utah 84302

 

WILLIAM CRANER (1832-1838)
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William was born 1 July 1832 in Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England. He was the seventh child and fifth son born to George Benjamin and Elizabeth West Craner. He was christened 29 July 1832 in Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England.
William died as a young boy, only five years old. He was buried 8 May 1838 in Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England.
Sources: Family Group Sheets, Naomi Lowe, 607 Holiday Drive, Brigham City, Utah 84302
Maxstoke Parish Records

 

HARRIET ANN CRANER (1834-1874)
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Harriet was born 26 April 1834 in Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England. She is the eighth child and third daughter born to George Benjamin and Elizabeth West Craner. She was christened 25 May 1834 in Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England. The family lived in Hall End in Maxstoke. Her father was a laborer.

In 1845, Harriet’s family listened to the missionaries of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Her mother was the first to be baptized, 5 June 1845 followed by her brother, George, 1 January 1846, and then Harriet, 6 January 1846. She was only 11 years old at the time. Her father was baptized 10 March 1846. Her two sisters, Ann and Martha were baptized in 1852 and another brother, Abraham Frederick was baptized in 1856.
Harriet Ann Craner
The family had a great desire to join the Saints in America. Harriet’s older brother, George, was the first of the family to come to America, in 1851. He worked and established a home and farm in Tooele, Tooele, Utah for the family to live. On 22 February1854, Harriet (age 20) along with her parents, two sisters, Ann (age 15), Martha (age 9) and her brother, John (age 11) set sail from Liverpool, England on the ship Windermere for America.
Alexander Harris
They had many harrowing experiences at sea. They arrived at New Orleans 23 April 1854. A few days later they boarded a steam boat and journeyed to St. Louis, Missouri. The journey then continued on to Kansas City. Harriet’s father died on the Kansas plains enroute to Salt Lake. Her mother and four children arrived in Salt Lake City on 1 Oct 1854. They immediately went on to Tooele, Tooele, Utah to live with George.
Harriet met Alexander Harris, who courted her, and they were married 21 June 1855 in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City, Utah.
Harriet and Alexander were the parents of ten children:

Name: Birth Date: Death Date:
1. Alexander Harris, Jr. 4 Sep 1856 20 Mar 1937
2. Harriet Ann Harris 18 Mar 1858 11 Sep 1906
3. Mary Elizabeth Harris 31 Dec 1859 21 Mar 1893
4. Martha Caroline Harris 27 Sep 1862 1 Feb 1946
5. George McGee Harris 10 Jan 1864 12 Jan 1864
6. Emily Deseret Harris 10 Jan 1864 2 Feb 1864
7. John Walter Harris 25 Apr 1868 23 Feb 1926
8. William Frederick Harris 27 Jun 1869 29 Dec 1935
9. Emma Arminta Harris 2 Sep 1872 6 Aug 1959
10. Gertrude Harris 9 Aug 1874 20 Oct 1960

Harriet was an excellent housekeeper, mother, and wife. She had a fine team of horses and a surrey which she drove about town. Alexander was an industrious early Mormon Pioneer. He came west with his family at the age of 15, in 1848. Alex was willing to do any task that was asked of him by his leader, and was appointed to help the suffering Saints of the Handcart Company when they were stranded in the snow. He took blankets and food, and helped save many lives.
The Harris’ went to Richmond when that community was settled, and lived in the old log fort.
During the Indian battle near Preston, Alex hauled some of the wounded soldiers to Salt Lake City.
Alex and his oldest son, Alexander, Jr. operated a freight train of wagons from Corinne, Utah to Butte, Montana. They each had two wagons. They trailed behind one other, with 16 head of mules to each train. This was a strenuous trip over rocks and creeks. There were no roads. At that time there were many Indians and outlaws roaming the country, and they were always on the alert. It was on one of these trips that Harriet passed away, 15 September 1874 in Richmond, Cache, Utah. She was 40 years old. There was no way of carrying news, save by pony express, so a runner was sent to tell Alexander the sad news. His eldest son, Alex Jr.,(age 18) never quite recovered from the death of his dear mother.
She left a family of seven children, the oldest being 18 years of age and the baby only 5 weeks old. Her oldest daughter, Harriet Ann, was 16.
Sources: Family Group Sheets and histories, Naomi Lowe, 607 Holiday Drive, Brigham City, Utah 84302
Histories, Vera McBride, Beth Sorenson, 5311 Brush Creek Bay, West Valley, Utah 84120
Maxstoke Parish records, Maxstoke, England
Immigration Records


ABRAHAM FREDERICK (1836-1878)
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Abraham Frederick was christened 3 April 1836 in Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England. He was the ninth child and sixth son born to George Benjamin and Elizabeth West Craner. They lived near Maxstoke. His father was a laborer.
Abraham Frederick
In 1845, when Frederick was nine years old, his family listened to the missionaries of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. His mother was the first to be baptized, 5 June 1845, followed by his brother, George, 1 January 1846, then his sister, Harriet, 6 January 1846 and then by his father, 10 March 1846. Two other sisters, Ann and Martha became members in 1852. Abraham Frederick was baptized in 1856 when he was 20 years of age. The family had a great desire to “come to Zion” and emigrate to America.

Abraham Frederick’s older brother, George, came to America in 1851. He established a home in Tooele, Tooele, Utah, and sent money to his family to emigrate. In 1854, his father, mother, three sisters, Harriet, Ann, and Martha, and one brother John made the trek. His father lost his life in Kansas en route, but the rest of the family successfully arrived in Tooele.
Harriet Smith
Abraham Frederick and another brother, Joseph and his family planned to emigrate together on the ship John J. Boyd in 1862. For some reason, Joseph did not come, and Abraham Frederick transferred to the ship William Tapscott and made the trip alone leaving Liverpool on 14 May 1862. He was 26 years of age. He came with the third and largest company of 807 Saints from Liverpool, England. After a successful forty-two day passage the ship reached New York on 25 June 1862.
He made the trek across the plains and joined his family in Tooele, Tooele, Utah. He became a citizen of the United States 6 April 1878. He married Harriet Smith in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City, 14 Aug 1878.
Abraham Frederick and Harriet were the parents of four children:

Name: Birth Date: Death Date
1. Charles Fredrick Craner 19 Oct 1879 16 Sep 1962
2. Joseph Hyrum Craner 20 Dec 1881 6 Sep 1951
3. Eva Harriet Craner 3 Feb 1885 23 Sep 1950
4. Albert Roy Craner 31 Jan 1888 7 Jan 1889

They moved to Oakley, Cassia, Idaho in the 1880's when Charles Fredrick was a baby. The rest of their children were born in Oakley, Cassia, Idaho.
Abraham Frederick homesteaded in Oakley along with his brother John and a nephew, George Craner. He died in Oakley, Cassia, Idaho and was buried there 23 February 1902. He was 65 years of age.

Abraham, Charles, Joseph
Eva & Harriet
Sources: Family Group Sheets, Naomi Lowe, 607 Holiday Drive, Brigham City, Utah 84302
Details from Immigration Records Maxstoke, England Parish Records

 

ANN CRANER (1838 – 1906)
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Ann was the tenth child and fourth daughter born to George Benjamin and Elizabeth West Craner 15 July 1838 in Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England. She was christened 12 August 1838 in Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England. The family lived in Maxstoke. Her father was a laborer.
When Ann was six years old her family listened to the missionaries of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Her mother was the first to be baptized, 5 June 1845 followed by her brother, George, 1 January 1846, and then her sister, Harriet, 6 January 1846. Her father was baptized 10 March 1846. Ann (age14) and another sister, Martha, were baptized in 1852. One other brother, Abraham Frederick was baptized in 1856.
For a short time Ann (age 14) lived in Coleshill Meridan, Warwickshire, England in the household of William Linforth and family as a servant nurse.
The Saints were encouraged to come to Zion in America when they were able. George, Ann’s older brother, came to America first in 1851. He established a home and farm in Tooele, Tooele, Utah and sent money to his family in England to emigrate. On 22 February 1854, Ann (age 15) along with her parents, two sisters Harriet (age 20), Martha (age 9) and her brother, John (age 11) set sail from Liverpool, England on the ship Windermere for America..
They had many harrowing experiences at sea. They arrived at New Orleans 23 April 1854. A few days later they boarded a steam boat and journeyed to St. Louis, Missouri. The journey then continued on to Kansas City. Ann’s father died on the Kansas plains en route to Utah. Her mother and the four children arrived in Salt Lake City, Utah on 1 October 1854. They then went on to Tooele, Tooele, Utah to live with George. What a joyous reunion and relief it was to finally arrive to their new home!
At the age of eighteen, Ann married Reuben Miller, 9 December 1856 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Reuben was a polygamist. When Ann married Reuben, he had two other wives, Rhoda Ann Letts, and Orice Burnham. He later married a fourth wife, Jane Hughes.
Reuben, his two wives and family, a hired hand by the name of Burk–eight of them all together– previously had immigrated from Nauvoo to the Salt Lake Valley in 1849. He brought with him four wagons, eleven oxen, five cows, two pigs, a dog, and a cat. The family settled near Cottonwood Creek, Salt Lake County, Utah. They lived in a dug-out for about 18 months before Reuben built a two story adobe dwelling house for his family, located in Mill Creek, Salt Lake County, Utah. He was a man of energy and soon became prosperous in farming and raising stock and sheep. He was a good provider for his large family.
In 1856 when Ann became Reuben’s third wife, he was well established. Ann lived the life of a polygamist wife. She was 20 years younger than his other two wives. They must have developed a good friendship and relationship in order to live in the same household and care for all of the children. Reuben was always involved in the church and community. He was Bishop of the Mill Creek Ward from 1850 until his death. He was elected county commissioner during the early days and held that office for 36 years. He was involved in the initial planning and construction of the early canals, principal roads and irrigation systems in the Salt Lake Valley. He sat at the convention of 1862 when a constitution was framed for the State of Deseret and a memorial was adopted asking for Utah’s admission into the Union.
In 1869, once again, Reuben took another young wife, Jane Hughes (age 20).
The 1870 Census of Mill Creek, Utah shows the Millers real estate of $5000, value of personal estate $2000. Living in the household was Reuben(age 58) his occupation as a farmer, his four wives, and twelve children living at home.
In the Mill Creek Ward records of 9 November 1875, it shows that Reuben Miller baptized his four wives, Rhoda Ann Letts, Orice Burnham, Ann Craner, Jane Hughes and five of his oldest children by Ann. Apparently, at that time, a person could be baptized more than just once.
Ann and Reuben were the parents of eleven children:

Name: Birth Date: Death Date:
1. Orrin Porter Miller 11 Sep 1858 7 Jul 1918
2. Mary Elizabeth Miller 5 Nov 1860 29 Jul 1901
3. Louisa Miller 22 Nov 1862 11 Oct 1883
4. George Benjamin Miller 19 Feb 1865 4 Mar 1927
5. Harriet Ann Miller 11 Mar 1867 24 May 1933
6. Lenora Miller 26 Mar 1869 22 Nov 1918
7. Milton Henry Miller 8 Aug 1871 31 Oct 1875
8. Walter Frederick Miller 6 Sep 1873 27 Oct 1942
9. Mailon John Miller 20 Sep 1877 16 Nov 1952
10. Nellie Craner Miller 30 Sep 1879 22 Mar 1935
11. Duane Reuben Miller 15 Jan 1883 6 June 1945

Ann outlived Reuben and the other three wives. She died 25 April 1906 in the Winder Ward, Mill Creek, Salt Lake, Utah and was buried 27 April 1906 in the City Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Utah. She was 67 years old.

Information on Reuben Miller
Reuben Miller was born 4 September 1811 in Reading, Burks, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Isaac and Esther Gline Miller. He died 22 July 1882, Mill Creek, Salt Lake, Utah.
He married Rhoda Ann Letts 17 April 1836 in Ottawa, La Sal, Illinois. Rhoda was born 25 November 1814 in Cumberland, Fayette, Pennsylvania. She died 2 August 1883 and was buried in the Salt Lake City Cemetery.
Rhoda and Reuben were the parents of ten children:

1. Edwin C. Miller, b. 9 Feb 1835, Dayton, La Sal, Illinois, d. 26 July 1838
2. James Robinson Miller, b. 2 Oct 1838, Dayton, La Sal, Illinois, d. 5 Apr 1903
3. Martha Miller, b. 17 Mar 1843, Dayton, La Sal, Illinois, d. 12 May 1843
4. Reuben Parley Miller, b. 22 Dec 1844, Beech Creek, La Sal, Illinois
5. Melvin Mormon Miller, b. 17 Oct 1846, Walsworth, Wisconsin, d. 2 Dec 1921
6. Chellion George Miller, b. 29 Nov 1848, Council Bluffs, Iowa, d. 9 Mar 1925
7. Edgar G. Miller, b. 22 June 1850, Mill Creek, Utah, d. 2 Jan 1853
8. Rhoda Ann Miller, b. 28 June 1852, Mill Creek, Utah, d. 20 Apr 1854
9. Uriah George Miller, b. 24 Sep 1854, d. 9 Dec 1857
10.David Letts Miller, b. 8 Oct 1856, Mill Creek, Utah, d. 6 June 1901

Reuben married Orice Brunham 15 December 1845, in Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois. Orice was born 20 Nov , 1815, in Mexico Onega, New York, and died.14 Feb 1890,she was buried in Salt Lake City Cemetery.
Orice and Reuben were the parents of three children:
1. Ellen Elizabeth Miller, b. 14 Feb 1850, Salt Lake, Utah, d. 28 May 1865
2. Charles Eugene Miller, b. 25 Aug 1852, Salt Lake, Utah d. 6 Aug 1921
3. Julie Ann Miller, b. 8 Oct 1854, Salt Lake, Utah, d. 3 June 1865

Reuben married Ann Craner 9 November 1856, in Salt Lake City, Utah, Ann and Reuben were the parents of eleven children, previously listed.

Reuben married Jane Hughes on 11 January 1869, in Salt Lake City, Utah. Jane was born. 21 January 1849, in Leominster, Hampshire, England and died 25 Sep 1893.
Jane and Reuben were the parents of six children:
1. Ella Jane Miller, b. 30 Dec 1869, Murray, Salt Lake, Utah, d. 31 Oct 1935
2. Frank Hughes Miller, b. 7 Apr 1872, Mill Creek, Utah, d. 1 Dec 1922
3. Letts Gleim Miller, b. 5 Mar 1874, Murray, Salt Lake, Utah, d. 5 Mar 1874
4. Esther Elizabeth Miller, b. 11 Apr 1876, Murray, Salt Lake, Ut, d. 6 Sep 1878
5. Emma Maria Miller, b. 16 Oct 1877, Murray, Salt Lake, Ut, d. 5 June 1944
6. Elias Smith Miller, b. 5 Aug 1882, Mill Creek, Salt Lake, Ut, d. 16 Oct 1934
Sources: Family Group Sheets, Naomi Lowe, 607 Holiday Drive, Brigham City, Utah 84302
Latter Day Saints Biographical Encyclopedia, 1870 Census Mill Creek, Utah,
Mill Creek Ward Records, 1875
Data Compiled by Heather Evans, England

 

JOHN CRANER (1842-1903)
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John was born 8 July 1842 in Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England. He was the eleventh child and the seventh son born to George Benjamin and Elizabeth West Craner. He was christened on the 8 September 1842 in Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England. He was raised along with his brothers and sisters in Maxstoke. His father was a laborer.
John Craner
In 1845, when he was just three years old, his family listened to the missionaries of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. His mother was the first to be baptized, 5 June 1845 followed by his brother, George, 1 January 1846, and then Harriet, 6 January 1846. Later, Ann and Martha were baptized in 1852, and Abraham Fredrick in 1856.
The family was encouraged, when they were able, to join the Saints in America. George, John’s older brother, left for America in 1851. He established a home and farm in Tooele, Tooele, Utah. He then sent money to his family to emigrate. In February of 1854, when John was 11 years old, his father, mother, Harriet (age 20), Ann (age 15), Martha (age 9) left Liverpool, England on the ship Windermere, for America.
They had many harrowing experiences at sea. They arrived in New Orleans 23 April 1854. A few days later they boarded a steam boat and journeyed to St. Louis, Missouri. The journey then continued on to Kansas City. John’s father died on the Kansas plains en route to Salt Lake. His mother and the four children arrived in Salt Lake City on 1 October 1854. They journeyed on to Tooele, Tooele, Utah to live with George.
The story or legend that John got permanently separated from his family coming to America is not true. On the census record taken in 1860 in Tooele, it lists John (age 17) and his mother, Elizabeth, (age 62) living with his brother, George, his wife Emma and their two children.
When John was 23 years of age he married Isabella Arminta Severe, 13 November 1865, in Grantsville, Tooele, Utah. They were later sealed in the Endowment House, 18 July 1870.
John and Isabella Arminta were the parents of fourteen children:

Name: Birth Date: Death Date:
1. John Harrison Craner 2 Sep 1866 29 Dec 1925
2. Dorcas Elizabeth Craner 6 Sep 1867 10 Jun 1903
3. Mary Ann Craner 2 Dec 1868 4 Aug 1955
4. Harriet Arminta Craner 7 May 1871 9 Apr 1881
5. George Fredrick Craner 13 Sep 1872 7 Jan 1952
6. Frank Austin Craner 28 Aug 1874 22 May 1881
7. Bertha Ophelia Craner 2 June 1876 5 Apr 1881
8. William Jasper Craner 20 Apr 1878 11 Dec 1936
9. Edith Janet Craner 30 Dec 1880 28 Jan 1881
10. Leo Melvin Craner 12 Dec 1881 20 Jul 1890
11. Richard Lee Craner 19 Jun 1884 20 Feb 1966
12. Nellie Deseret Craner 26 Aug 1885 17 Apr 1975
13. Wallace West Craner 26 Jan 1888 11 Oct 1960
14. Emily Blanche Craner 28 Jul 1889 1 May 1959

John and Isabella Arminta lived in Richmond, Cache, Utah during their first year of marriage. John had a high-risk job of carrying gold dust from the placer mines to Salt Lake City. He had to be constantly on the alert for highwaymen and marauding Indians. The pay was excellent and the newlyweds felt like it was worth the risk. The venture succeeded for a year without any alarming incident. After their first child, John Harrison, was born in Richmond in 1866, they moved back to Grantsville, Tooele, Utah. They lived there until 1881. Eight of their fourteen children were born while living in Grantsville.
In 1881, John and Arminta along with their five children, John Harrison, Dorcas Elizabeth, Mary Ann, George Fredrick, William Jasper moved to Idaho. (Four of their nine children died in 1881 due to a diphtheria epidemic in Grantsville) They helped to colonize the Goose Creek Valley. They began life anew in a two room, dirt roof log cabin on 160 acres of sagebrush homestead.

Isabella Arminta Severe
Their homestead was located within a mile of the townsite of Oakley, Cassia, Idaho. The children attended school in Oakley and as teens attended Oakley L.D.S Academy. John’s brother, Fredrick and his family, and also his nephew, George Craner and his family, also homesteaded in Oakley, Idaho.
In the new neighborhood, the couple soon became known as Uncle Jack and Aunt Mint Craner. The log cabin was sentimentally christened “The Sway Back Hotel!” The Craners drew that kind of community affection. There was always room for another sojourner or passerby at their table or under their roof, even with quite a houseful of their own.
On 9 June 1881, John took a second wife in marriage, Dorcas Louisa McBride. They were the parents of two children. James was born in Grantsville and Hyrum was born in Oakley, Cassia, Idaho.

1. James Elmer Craner 9 Apr 1882 3 Apr 1953
2. Hyrum Ray Craner 3 Apr 1885 24 Jun 1956

During 1881 - 1890 five more children were born to John and Arminta. By 1890, death among the younger and marriage of the three older children trimmed the number at home to Fred, Will, Lee, Wallace and two daughters, Nellie and Emily.
Aided by husky sons and a capable wife and daughters, Jack Craner now had the homestead on a paying basis. Their larder was always full and some to spare. Nothing was ever bought until there was cash or produce on hand to pay for it. So, by 1893, “The Sway Back Hotel” had given way to a seven room brick house with all furnishings that were then available in Salt Lake or other far Western points, and it was all paid for. There were Axminster carpets, lace curtains, kitchen linoleum, and other items that served to give luxurious comfort to the new home.
Just before the new home was completed, Uncle Jack received word that the windows, doors, interior trim and other finish material was at Kelton, Utah–the nearest railroad point at that time. So, with two outfits of horses and wagons, Uncle Jack and his young son, Wallace, on one and another son, John Harrison, on the other, they set out for Kelton for the prized material.
They had loaded the material and were nearing Almo, Idaho on their return, when Uncle Jack’s load–some two ton of it–slid forward, throwing Uncle Jack to the ground between the horses, which began to run. The wagon wheels passed over the fallen man’s mid section, crushing his chest and abdomen, and all but severed his body. Only deep dust in the wagon ruts prevented “death on the spot.”
John Harrison was traveling ahead. Hearing the commotion, he secured his own team by tying the lines to the brake lever, jumped to the ground, sieged the on rushing team by the bits and brought it under control. There was the child, Wallace, with legs and arms securely locked around the run away wagon tongue. He was unhurt except for scratches along his thighs where the kicking horses had riddled his overalls to shreds.
After first aid to his stricken father, John Harrison mounted one horse of the run away team and leading the other, set out for a distant ranch house where he secured the use of a white top buggy and the assistance of the rancher, “A Mr. Taylor” to bring Uncle Jack to the Taylor home. Then John Harrison set out for Oakley, delivering the child, Wallace, to the family at home, and returning with Aunt Mint and an extra teamster. The loaded wagons were then taken on to their home destination.
Uncle Jack was in most critical condition and was miles over rough country from home. It would have cost a small fortune--if indeed a doctor could have been persuaded at all--to come from Salt Lake over such wilderness to the sick bed. But they were together. Together they had seen their share of sickness and death. Uncle Jack was as strong in faith as he had been in physical proportion. Aunt Mint, with dauntless faith, had been more than a nurse for ten years to the new community of Goose Creek.
They had believed unshakable in the ordinances of their religious faith and had lived up to them. God wouldn’t forsake them in their critical plight. Though stricken in wilderness for the moment, they refused to fear. They were able to return to their family and finished the “New Brick Home”. Uncle Jack never became an invalid, as a lesser individual might have done. He recovered to a point of supervising home affairs. He never was his powerful self after the accident. He was able to enjoy this beautiful home for 10 years before his death 4 August 1903 in Oakley, Cassia, Idaho. He was 61 years old.
Information on Dorcas Louisa McBride:
b. 14 Feb 1861, Grantsville, Tooele, Utah, d. 9 July 1930, Oakley, Cassia, Idaho, daughter of James and Marion Louisa Redden McBride, md John Craner 9 June 1881, Endowment House in Salt Lake City, Utah, two children: James Elmer, b. 9 Apr 1882, d. 3 Apr 1953, Hiram Ray Craner, b. 3 Apr 1885, d. 24 Jun 1956, Two other marriages - no other children.
In Dorcas’ own words: “ I was born and raised in Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah. I am the granddaughter of Thomas McBride that was murdered at Haun’s Mill. My other grandfather, R. J. Redden, came with President Brigham Young in the first company of pioneers. I have worked in all the auxiliary organizations of the church. At the present time, I am one of the ward committeemen in the genealogical work in the Oakley 3rd Ward. I love the work and am especially interested in the work. I am also a teacher in the Relief Society and am always a worker in the Relief Society and Sunday School, and a regular attendant at Sacrament Meetings. I love the work of the Lord. I am a homemaker. I do my own cooking, washing, ironing, put up all our fruit, jellies, preserves, vegetables, make our own soap to wash with, do everything needed in a home. I am greatly blessed with a strong body.”

 

JOHN HARRISON CRANER (1866 – 1925)
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John Harrison was born 2 September 1866 in Richmond, Cache, Utah. He was the first child born to John and Isabella Arminta Severe Craner. The family lived in Richmond, Utah until John H. was about a year old, and then moved to Grantsville, Utah where they spent the next fifteen years. John H. was blessed 16 July 1871 by William Jeffries, in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He was baptized a member of that Church 24 September 1875 in Grantsville by Edward Hunter, and confirmed by John M. Clark.
John H attended school at Grantsville, Utah; at the age of 15 his family moved to Oakley.
Rosena Lee was born 15 May 1867 in Grantsville, Tooele, Utah. She was the 7th child of 8 children born to William R. & Jane Lyon Lee. Jane Lyon was the 2nd wife of William Lee. William Lee was called by authorities of the Church to be a government agent to the Indians at Ibapah (Deep Creek), Utah. He was gone from home a lot, but performed his duties as Brigham Young instructed. Rosena’s mother passed away at the age of 39, leaving a large family to shift along the best they could. The oldest sister, Mary Jane, was married by this time and had moved to Oakley, Idaho. She took the two youngest children with her, Charlotte Elizabeth and Rosena.
At the age of eight Rosena began working for her room and board for other people, she received very little schooling but learned quickly from others.
John Harrison Craner and Rosena Lee were married 2 July 1884 in Rock Creek, Idaho. John H.’s father gave a portion of his land to the couple, on which was built a three room log house.
John H. and Rosena were the parents of 12 Children:
Name Birth Date: Death Date:
1. John Clarence Craner 21 Jun 1885 8 Jul 1950
2. William Carlos Craner 21 Feb 1887 1 Oct 1887
3. Bertha May Craner 8 Feb 1889 28 Jan 1967
4. Edith Craner 16 Sep 1891 19 Mar 1946
5. Altha Jane Craner 11 May 1893 26 May 1900
6. George Melvin Craner 2 Nov 1894 28 Mar 1956
7. Arleth Lyle Craner 19 Sept 1897 30 May 1965
8. Dewey Maine Craner 8 May 1899 29 Nov 1984
9. Winnie Ray 15 May 1902 8 Aug 1978
10. Zelda Craner 30 Dec 1904 19 Jan 1906
11. Ross Lee Craner 10 Sept 1906
12. Neola Rose 31 May 1911 12 Apr 1996

All of the children were born in Oakley, Cassia, Idaho. William Carlos passed away in 1887 of convulsions (thought to be caused from poison flowers brought in by admiring children) he was eight months old.
John H. bought 80 acres including a beautiful fruit orchard and the large 12 room red brick home from Ehlam McBride, it was 1 ½ miles from Oakley. It has 7 bedrooms, a large parlor, dining room, kitchen, pantry and a bathroom (unusual for those days). This home was originally planned for a nursery and a hospital but circumstances changed the plans of the McBrides.
After purchasing this home John H. gave ground for the 3rd Ward Chapel to be built and as he watered his own land he watered those yards too.
Rosena was often called by Doctors Oldhen and Neilson to help deliver babies. She was a Relief Society Visiting Teacher for many years, and did substitute teaching in the classes.
John H and Clarence bought 500 acres in 1918 and planted alfalfa. They built a small house, and in the summer the family moved to a little place called Churchill.
Edith married Alma Hyrum Wells on 24 Dec 1913 in the Salt Lake LDS Temple. They had six children and two step-daughters.
Arleth married Gladys Lee, an adopted daughter of his uncle, on 18 Sept 1916 and they had six children.
Dewey married Margaret Allen 18 Sept 1918. She lived only a few months as she caught the flu and passed away on 9 Jan 1919, she was pregnant at the time.
There were two bad years when the flu raged through the country and took thousands of people in death; this epidemic took more lives in our country than did the World War. Schools and all public gathering places closed. 13 family members were down with the flu at one time, help was almost impossible to get. John H. hired two men to nurse and care for his family. He nursed the family day and night until he finally took sick too. John had a partial stroke, along with the flu, as his left hand and arm was numb for some time and he had trouble with his speech for some time after.
John and Rosena traded the farm in Oakley to Arleth and Gladys for land they owned in Paul, Idaho.
Rosena took ill in 1922, John and Alma Wells took her to the doctors in Salt Lake City and they found she was full of cancer. She died 2 April 1923 in Paul, Idaho and was buried in the Oakley Cemetery.
John sold the home in Paul and went back to Churchill and lived with his son, Clarence. John married long time friend Alpha Judd Elquist. They lived at the Elquist ranch, called the “Land Ranch”.
John died 29 December 1925 from a heart attack. He was buried in the Oakley Cemetery next to Rosena.

 

JOHN CLARENCE CRANER (1885 – 1950)
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Clarence was born 21 June 1885 in Oakley, Cassia, Idaho. He was the first child of John Harrison and Rosena Lyon Lee Craner.
Clarence married Sarah Turner 12 December 1912. They were the parents of one son:

Name: Birth Date: Death Date:
1. Ralph W. Craner 28 Feb 1912 17 Nov 1990

Clarence married Amelia Marilla Tracy on 4 January 1925 in Ogden, Utah. They were the parents of three daughters:

Name: Birth Date: Death Date:
1. Barbara Craner 6 Apr 1927
2. Rose Mary Craner 22 Apr 1929
3. Clarica Craner 6 Sept 1931

Clarence was a rancher and sheep man who owned a ranch at Elba, Idaho. They sold out and bought the Oakley Tavern. Clarence and Amelia ran the tavern for quite a few years; the long hours and age difference caused a divorce on 12 December 1942. Clarence moved to Richmond, California to work in the Kaiser shipyards. He returned some years later to Oakley where he herded sheep for a living and bought the old Bill Lee house from Cliff and Neola Dutchie Dayley.
On 17 March 1950 he was operated on and found full of cancer. He died at his home on the 8 July 1950. He was buried 11 July 1950 in the Oakley Cemetery next to his parents.
Sources: Personal Knowledge of Winnie Rae Dayley, Funeral service transcription. Submitted by Marsha Sparhawk, Edited by Jeri Ann Fogg

 

WILLIAM CARLOS CRANER
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William was born 21 February 1887 in Oakley, Cassia, Idaho. He was the second son born to John Harrison and Rosena Lyon Lee Craner. William passed away 1 October 1887 of convulsions, thought to have been caused from poison flowers brought in by admiring children. He was eight months old.
Source: History written by Winnie Ray Craner Wold
Submitted by Marsha Sparhawk and Winnie Wold, Edited by Jeri Ann Fogg

 

BERTHA MAY CRANER (1889 – 1967)
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Bertha was born 8 February 1889 in Oakley, Cassia, Idaho. She was the third child and first daughter born to John Harrison and Rosena Lyon Lee Craner. Bertha had a very happy life and loving parents.
When she was about eleven years old her family moved into a lovely brick home. Here her friends and other members of the community came to dance. They would roll up the rugs and dance to the family orchestra which consisted of a piano, violin, and a guitar.
In 1906 Bertha met Alma Lee, at a dance in Marion, Idaho. He was a returned Missionary who had come to Idaho where his mother had moved while he had been away in the Southern States Mission. Alma was full of jokes and loved to tell and pull jokes on people.
Shortly after they met Alma went to Idaho Falls, Idaho to work. Before he left he ask Bertha to write to him. She would see him a few times when he could come to Oakley. During that year the spark of romance burst into love. They were married 19 September 1907 in the Salt Lake LDS Temple.
Al and Bertha were the parents of six children:

Name: Birth Date: Death Date:
1. Philma Craner 12 Sep 1908 5 Jul 1928
2. Loyd Craner 15 May 1910 20 Aug 1980
3. Beulah Craner 23 Sep 1911 10 Aug 1978
4. Wilmer Craner 8 Jan 1913 8 Jan 1960
5. Zelda Craner 2 Jan 1915
6. Ross Craner 10 Dec 1916 8 Nov 1986

Al and Bertha lived in Idaho Falls for a short time while Al worked in the sugar factory. They returned to Artesian City, near Twin Falls, Idaho and ran a store and Post Office. Al got a timber contract with the U.C. Company and they took their 5 children and lived in a trailer house on the top of a mountain for a winter and summer. For ten years they moved all around Magic Valley (Twin Falls, Idaho area) working on road construction and farming.
Alma’s health was bad and his eyes were failing. In 1928 he and Bertha took their three youngest children and went to Salt Lake City to see an eye specialist. Philma went down with them on her vacations from the natatorium where she worked. She was a happy fun-filled girl always ready for some new adventure. She was planning on going back home on the bus but while in Salt Lake she met a fellow she had known who offered to take her home with him on his motorcycle. This was a new adventure so Philma accepted his offer. Just south of Burley, with only a few more miles to go, a car forced the motorcycle off the road and Philma was thrown off, hitting her head against a rock. A few short hours later, on 5 July 1928, without regaining consciousness, Philma passed away before her loved ones could make it to Burley.
That fall they moved to Torrinton, Wyoming, where Alma and the two oldest boys worked in the sugar factory. They returned to Twin Falls and bought a home. Two years later they sold it and moved to Jerome where they farmed about nine years before buying a farm in Richfield. Three years later Alma’s health had failed so that he couldn’t work any longer, so they rented the farm to Loyd and moved to California. In March of 1946 they moved back to Twin Falls and the following October, Alma passed away.
Bertha returned to California for the winter and then moved back to Jerome. In 1948 she built a home of cinder blocks. She and her brother Melvin lived there for four years. While she was there she improved the farm and had cement walks made.
On 9 July 1952, construction began on the home Bertha built on Main St in Jerome. She had rented her farm to Clifford and Neola Dayley a few years prior. Bertha moved into her new home just before Thanksgiving and the family came for Thanksgiving dinner. She said this was one of the happiest days in her life.
Bertha died 28 Jan 1989 in Jerome, Jerome, Idaho and was buried in Oakley, Cassia, Idaho.

Loyd Craner owns his own farm in Richfield, Idaho. He is married to Fay and they have two children.
Beulah married Guy Bliesner. They are the parents of two sons.
Wilmer married Eva and they lived in Jerome where he was engaged in farming. In 1942 they moved to California where he worked for Bethlehem Steel in San Francisco. He then joined the Merchant Marines when World War II was declared. After his discharge from the service he farmed in Sacramento. While farming and working for the Southern Pacific Railroad, it was discovered that he had a serious heart condition. About a year later he was sent to the Southern Pacific Hospital where he underwent surgery on 8 December 1959. Bertha went down to be with him while he was operated on; and when he started to recover she came back home to Jerome. On January 4, Ross and Bertha received word he was critically ill, and they flew down immediately. Bertha stayed there until he passed away on 27 January 1960. Wilmer and his wife, Eva Lavonia Billman had three children.
Zelda lived on a farm in Richfield, Idaho. She married twice. After her second husband’s death in 1949 she moved to California. Zelda had three children.
Ross worked in the garage and car business for several years. Ross married Mildred and they had five children.
Sources: Life Story of …..Bertha May Craner Lee (Bertha told to a granddaughter, Marsha Lee, 1962)
Submitted by Marsha Sparhawk Edited by Jeri Ann Fogg

 

EDITH CRANER (1891 -1946)
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Edith was born 16 September 1891 in Oakley, Cassia, Idaho. She was the fourth child and second daughter born to John Harrison and Rosena Lyon Lee Craner. Edith married Alma Hyrum Wells 24 December 1913 in the Salt Lake City LDS Temple.
Edith and Alma where the parents of six children.
Edith died 19 March 1946 in Twin Falls Idaho and was buried in Oakley, Idaho. Alma died 8 March 1959.

 

ALTHA JANE CRANER (1891 – 1946)
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Altha was born 11 May 1893 in Oakley, Cassia, Idaho. She was the fifth child and third daughter born to John Harrison and Rosena Lyon Lee Craner. Altha died 26 May 1900 at the age of 7.

 

GEORGE MELVIN CRANER (1894 – 1956)
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Melvin was born 23 November 1894 in Oakley, Cassia, Idaho. He was the sixth child and third son born to John Harrison and Rosena Lyon Lee Craner. Melvin married Mary Emma Tracy 18 November 1922. They did not have children of there own but loved all children they knew. Melvin died 28 March 1956 in Oakley, Idaho.
Source: History written by Winnie Ray Craner Wold
Submitted by Marsha Sparhawk. Edited by Jeri Ann Fogg

 

ARLETH (BINK) LYLE CRANER (1896 – 1965)
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Arleth was born 19 August 1896, in Oakley, Cassia, Idaho. He was the seventh child, fourth son born to John Harrison and Rosena Lyon Lee Craner.
Arleth married Gladys Lee 17 December 1914 in Oakley, Cassia, Idaho. They had six children: Leone (Midge), Richard (Dick), Arleth (Pete), Betty, Bobby and Shirley.
Arleth was very good at breaking work horses and every one farmed with horses. People even brought horses from Wyoming for him to break. He was a farmer in Artesian City.
Arleth died 30 May 1965 in Las Vegas, Clark, Nevada and was buried in Oakley, Cassia, Idaho.

 

ARLETH (PETE) CRANER
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Pete was born 8 January 1918
At eight years old and on horseback he helped his father trail a herd of cattle six miles to the Murtaugh stockyard to be shipped by train. Pete started working by helping put up hay when he was fifteen. At sixteen he went to work for Frank Summers moving sheep camp in the Sawtooth Mountains and Stanley Basin. He worked five years for Frank spending summers in the mountains. In the winters he was feeding and lambing sheep. Pete also worked for Ray Oliver and cowboys. The work was hard. They had to break horses and they broke a lot of them.
Pete married Leah Severe. They were the parents of twin boys Ronald Lee and Donald Dee. They also had a daughter Bonnie Jean. They farmed in Artesian and Murtaugh, Idaho.
Source: History by Arleth (Pete) Craner Submitted by Marsha Sparhawk. Edited by Jeri Ann Fogg

 

DEWEY MAINE CRANER (1898 – 1965)
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Dewey was born 8 May 1898 in Oakley, Cassia, Idaho. He was the eighth child and fifth son of John Harrison and Rosena Lyon Lee Craner. He went to grade school and one year at Oakley Academy.
He left home and went to Three Creek, Idaho in 1916 and punched cows for Carl Patrick; then later for Jack Campbell in Buhl, Idaho. Dewey returned home and leased a lot of land. They cleared sagebrush off the land and built fences with rocks. He made $5 or $6 a day.
On 18 September 1918 Dewey married Margaret Allen in Burley, Cassia, Idaho. Margaret was a very nice girl, serous minded. She was very good at public speaking and recited songs instead of singing them. They rented two rooms from Dewey’s father in the lovely brick home in Oakley.
In January 1919, when the flu was raging, many died and Margaret, who was pregnant, was one of them. Everyone at the house was sick at once with it. John H. was the only one that didn’t get it. He took care of them day and night.
Dewey farmed with his father and brother Clarence for a year and then moved with his father to Paul, Idaho.
Dewey married Lillian Davidson Hammond in 1923 in Paul, Minidoka, Idaho. Lillian was a telephone operator. She had been married before and had a son Edward who was about 12 years old. Lillian was a quiet person, reserved and very nice. She was an exceptionally good cook, friendly with everyone, and had lots of friends.
Dewey worked for the sugar factory in Paul and was later transferred to Missoula, Montana from 1927 to 1933. He was later transferred to Logan, Utah and was warehouse foreman over the three warehouses at Smithfield, Logan, and Ogden.
While living in Logan, Utah. Dewey and Lillian planned a vacation with their friends, the Dean Browns. The women traveled in one car and the men in another since they each had coups. The men planned to fish on the way. They were to meet in Idaho Falls, Idaho and then continue on to Yellowstone Falls. But tragedy occurred. As they were traveling along, a gravel truck came from a side road without stopping and collided into the women’s car killing Lillian instantly and injuring Mrs. Brown’s neck. Gradually Mrs. Brown regained her health. Lillian was buried in the cemetery in Oakley, Idaho.
Dewey was transferred to Sacramento, California. In 1941 he married Helen Tucker. In 1944 he was selected by Lester J. Homes, Plant Manager, to be Fieldman in the Lisbon and West Sacramento districts. He had unusual success in this field of work as he was well liked by the farmers and factory men, alike. He had an uncanny knack for getting along with people. He had a wide knowledge of sugar production, as well as production of sugar beets which made him a valuable man.
Dewey died 29 November 1984 in West Sacramento, Sacramento, California and was buried there.
Source: Winnie Rae Dayley, Submitted by Marsha Sparhawk. Edited by Jeri Ann Fogg

 

WINNIE RAE CRANER (1902 – 1978)
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Winnie was born 15 May 1902 in Oakley, Cassia, Idaho. She was the ninth child and fourth daughter born to John Harrison and Rosena Lyon Lee.
Winnie married Leonard Ephraim Wold 5 June 1919 in Burley, Cassia, Idaho. They made their home in Paul Idaho where Leo was working at Amalgamated Sugar Company as a beet end foreman. They rented a small house until the spring of 1920 when they got one of the sugar factory houses on sugar row.
Winnie and Leonard were the parents of three children:
Name: Birth Date: Death Date:
1. Leonard “Sonny” Eldon Craner 14 Dec 1920
2. Dorothy Aileen Craner 30 Mar 1925
3. Thelma Rae Craner 12 July 1928

On 2 April 1923 Winnie’s mother passed away and her 12 year old sister Neola “Dutchie” went to live with Winnie and Leo. She lived with them until the spring of 1925 when they moved to Tracy, California so Leo could work for the Holly Sugar Company. In April 1926 the family moved to Torrington, Wyoming. Dutchie once again lived with them. She went to High School in Torrington. Dutchie was very close to them and they often referred to her as their oldest daughter.
Leo worked thirty years for the Holly Sugar Company and retired on a small pension in 1957 at the age of 65. Winnie died 8 August 1978 in Torrington, Goshen, Wyoming and was buried there. Leonard died 4 February 1982 in Torrington.
Source: History written by Leonard Wold and Story by Dorothy Wold Farmer. Submitted by Marsha Sparhawk.
Edited by Jeri Ann Fogg

 

ZELDA CRANER (1904 – 1906)
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Zelda was born 30 December 1904 in Oakley, Cassia, Idaho. She was the tenth child and fifth daughter born to John Harrison and Rosena Lyon Lee. Zelda died 19 January 1906 in Oakley, Cassia, Idaho, she was two years old.

 

ROSS LEE CRANER (1907 – 1997)
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Ross was born 10 September 1907 in Oakley, Cassia, Idaho. He was the eleventh child and sixth son born to John Harrison and Rosena Lyon Lee. As a boy Ross helped his dad milk cows, pack water to the house from the wheel, it had a windmill on it and if the wind didn’t blow then they had to pump it hand. He pulled weeds to feed the hogs, chopped wood and whatever – “be obedient or else”! Each Sunday we went to church. Ross also helped his mother on wash day especially, pulled the handle to the washing machine, and turned the wringer to squeeze the water from the clothes.
As a teenager Ross worked as hired help on several different farms. At age 17 he went to work as a cowboy on Dead Wood Ranch, East of Three Creek, earning $40 a month. He also worked in the sheep business fro several years. Next he went to work in Sugar at American Crystal Sugar Company in Torrington, Wyoming and then at Amalgamated Sugar Company in Missoula Montana. One of the Sugar factories was moved to Clarksburg, California. Ross helped put it together and worked there for a couple of years.
Ross decided to move on to Southern California. He lived with friends, John and Lola Truatwein. He got a job with New Port Dredging Company near Long Beach and Coasta Mesa. After a few years, he decided to move to Santa Monica, California where his uncle Fred and Aunt Altha Craner lived. They were painters and taught Ross the trade and he worked with them.
At a party Ross met Rhea Grace Bellander and they were married 1 July 1940 in Ely, White Pine, Nevada. For the next few years they would go to Sacramento to work in the sugar factory for the sugar campaign and then move back to Santa Monica and paint.
Ross and Rhea where the parents of two children:

Name: Birth Date: Death Date”
1. John Albin Craner 24 Nov 1941
2. Donna Marie Craner 30 June 1944

In 1943 they moved to Nevada and managed ranches: Bellander’s, Bakers Ranch, Devil’s Gate Ranch near Elko, Loyd Sorensen’s Ranch at Lamoille, Nevada.
In 1956 in need for a high school for John they moved to Kimberly, Idaho and bought a home at 415 S Main. After a year they moved to California as wages weren’t good in Idaho. In 1968 Ross retired and moved back to Kimberly, Idaho and the house they bought and had rented out all those years.
Ross died 12 April 1996 in Kimberly, Twin Falls, Idaho and was buried in Oakley, Idaho.

 

NEOLA “DUTCHIE” ROSE CRANER (1911 -1996)
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Neola was born 31 May 1911 in Oakley, Cassia, Idaho. She was the twelfth child and sixth daughter born to John Harrison and Rosena Lyon Lee.
Neola’s brothers gave her the name of Dutchie maybe because of the way she talked. She was known as Dutchie throughout her life.
A flu epidemic hit the valley during the winter of 1918. There were 13 in the household down with the flu. Dutchie’s father waited on the family until he also became ill. Her Brother Dewey’s wife, Margaret Allen, died as she was pregnant and the flu took most of the women in this condition. The Nationwide flu took more lives than did World War I.
Dutchie’s family lived on 80 acres including a beautiful fruit orchard and a large 12 room red brick home. In 1918 John H and Clarence bought 500 acres and planted alfalfa. They built a small house, and in the summer the family moved to a little place called Churchill. Then John H. traded the farm in Oakley for land in Paul, Idaho.
Rosena, took ill in 1922, they took her to the doctors in Salt Lake City and they found she was full of cancer. She died 2 April 1923 in Paul, Idaho and was buried in the Oakley Cemetery.
John sold the home in Paul and went back to Churchill and lived with his son, Clarence. Dutchie went to live with her sister Winnie and her husband Leonard. She stayed with them until they moved to California. Her father, John H had married long time friend Alpha Judd Elquist. They lived at the Elquist ranch, called the “Land Ranch”. Dutchie went to live with them.
John died 29 December 1925 from a heart attack. He was buried in the Oakley Cemetery next to Rosena.
During her freshman year of high school Dutchie received her share of her father’s estate. She decided to use it to qualify herself to work so she went through a nine month business course at Gregg Business College in Twin Falls. She was unable to find a job upon graduation. So she moved to Torrington, Wyoming where Winnie and Leonard had moved to from California. Dutchie went back to high school.
Neola married Clifford Dayley 1 November 1930 in Rupert, Idaho. After the wedding, they went back to the land Ranch where friends and relatives were waiting. Fearing a chivaree, they ran around the house. Neola fell into the kitchen cesspool and Cliff jumped in after her nearly to their armpits and this was the beginning of married life.
Neola and Clifford were the parents of 3 children:
Name: Birth Date: Death Date:
1. Jacquie Dayley 26 Mar 1933
2. Winnie Dayley 27 Oct 1937
3. Devon Carlos (Toby) Dayley 12 Aug 1955

Neola was told she should not have any more children after Winnie if she wanted to live to raise them.
In 1938 the family moved into a two story rock house in Oakley. Then in December 1947 they moved to Richfield, Idaho. Wherever they moved, Neola would make the yard and gardens a work of art. They moved twice more, once in 1955 to a farm outside of Richfield and then in 1971 moved into Richfield.
It was on 22 October 1993 after spending a good day fishing with Cliff, in which she out fished him, Neola had a debilitating stroke that paralyzed her left side. Neola died 12 April 1996, in Kimberly, Idaho and was buried in Oakley, Idaho.


JACQUIE LOU DAYLEY (1933 - )
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Jacquie was born 26 Mar 1933 in Oakley, Cassia, Idaho. She is the oldest daughter of Clifford Carlos and Neola (Dutchie) Rose Craner Dayley. Jacquie married Richard Charles Luff, oldest son of Ervin Albert and Ruby Fay Carter Peterson Luff, on 7 May 1955 in Richfield, Idaho. Their marriage was later solemnized in the Idaho Falls LDS Temple.
There first home was in Shoshone, Idaho where Richard was employed by an area farmer. In November 1955 Richard went to work for Mountain Bell Phone Company. They moved into a small house in Twin Falls.
Richard and Jacquie are the parents of three children:

Name: Birth Date: Death Date:
1. Kelvan Ray “Kelly” Dayley 9 Jun 1956
2. Kendall Lee Dayley 8 Apr 1958
3. Kimball C. Dayley 22 Dec 1963

In 1957 they moved to Kimberly, Idaho and raised their family there. Richard worked for Mountain Bell Phone Company until the company broke up. He then worked for AT&T until November 1986 when he took an early retirement because of company cut backs. He gave 31 years of service before he retired. He has occupied his time since perfecting his wood working skills and doing short term optic fiber cable jobs and keeping busy with their huge yard.
Jacquie, with Richard’s help, took care of the LDS Church that was across the street from their home for 20 years. It was there that their sons learned their work ethic. In July 1979 Jacquie went to work for Betaseed, a company that does research on sugar beets. She retired at the end of March of 1995.
Kelvan “Kelly” received his master’s degree in Soil Physics and Agronomy at Utah State University in Logan, Utah. He served an LDS mission in Thailand. Kelly married Barbara Lynne Westfall and they had 4 children: Richard Michael, Kelvan Clifford, Heather Marie and Rachael Lynne. In 1993 after the death of Donna Craner Gines, Kelly and Lynn took Casey into their home to raise.
Kendall chose construction as his occupation and was trained by his very competent father-in-law, Don Litzenger. Kendall loves being a carpenter and it shows in the quality of his work. He married Nancy Rose Litzinger on 3 April 1977. They have two boys Zackery Kendall and Cameron Lee. They were divorced in 1994.
Kimball also became a carpenter. He went to work right out of high school in the Hailey/Sun Valley area. He loves the mountain country where he does a lot of hunting, fishing and back packing during his free time. Kimball is unmarried.

 

WINNIE RAE DAYLEY (1937 - )
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Winnie was born 27 October 1937. She is the second child of Clifford Carlos and Neola (Dutchie) Rose Craner Dayley. Winnie weighed in at 4 pounds. Her feet were turned grotesquely upward against her ankles. With the fervent prayers of her mother and warm olive oil, she gently forced Winnie’s feet back into a normal position.
When Winnie was ten, the family moved from the land of their ancestors (Oakley, Idaho) to Richfield, Idaho where Cliff continued to farm and Neola, as always, had beautiful gardens and flowers.
Eight years after they moved to Richfield, they had a son, Devon Carlos (Toby) on 12 August 1955. He weighed in at a whopping 8 lbs, a pound more than his sisters put together. The girls loved there little brother.
Winnie graduated from RHS in 1956. Attended airline training in Kansas City and started working for United Airlines in San Francisco, California. After two years, she transferred to Reno, Nevada, where she met Jessie Reed West.
Jessie was born 12 September 1936 in Jonesville, Virginia. He is the son of George Newton West and Bertha Elzora Ballard.
Winnie and Jessie were married 16 July 1959. They are the parents of four children.
Name: Birth Date: Death Date
1. Teri Lynn West 3 Aug 1960
2. Tami Lee West 19 Nov 1961
3. Jesse Reid West 15 Oct 1970
4. Sean Michael West 15 Sep 1973

Jessie was discharged from the Air Force in October 1963 and they moved to Painesville, Ohio for a few months. Jessie came back to Reno to work for the Nevada Air National Guard in April of 1964. Winnie transferred back in June. Winnie became a full time Mom after Jesse was born and Jessie continued with the Guard.
In 1985 Winnie suffered a stroke from which she recovered well. Jessie retired from the Air National Guard in May 1986. They moved to Alpine, Texas for three years. They were sealed in the Dallas, Texas LDS Temple 2 January 1987.
In June of 1989, Jessie, Winnie and Sean moved to Richfield, Idaho to be closer to Winnie’s parents.
Jesse moved his family to Richfield in 1991 and is a tile setter in the Sun Valley area.
Sean graduated from Richfield High School in 1992. He is employed by the city of Richfield.
Teri and her family moved to Richfield in February of 1995. Her husband is a carpet installer.
Tami and her family live in Reno, Nevada.
Source: History written by Winnie Rae Dayley West and edited by Jeri Ann Fogg

 

MARTHA CRANER (1844-1916)
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Martha was born 16 May 1844 in Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England. She was the youngest of the twelve children and the fifth daughter born to George and Elizabeth West Craner. She lived in Maxstoke until she was nine years old. She then immigrated to America with her family.
In 1845, Martha’s family listened to the missionaries of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Her mother was the first to be baptized, 5 June 1845 followed by her brother, George, 1 January 1846, and then Harriet, 6 January 1846. Her father was baptized 10 March 1846. In 1852, Ann and Martha were baptized. Another brother, Abraham Fredrick was baptized in 1856. The Saints were encouraged to gather to Zion in America.
George, her brother, came first in 1851 and established a home and farm in Tooele, Tooele, Utah, and then sent money for the rest of the family to come. On 22 February 1854, Martha’s parents, two of her sisters, Harriet (age 20) and Ann (age 15), her brother, John (age 11) and Martha (age 9) set sail from Liverpool, England on the ship Windermere for America.
They had many harrowing experiences at sea. They arrived at New Orleans 23 April 1854. A few days later they boarded a steam boat and journeyed to St. Louis, Missouri. The journey then continued on to Kansas City. Martha celebrated her tenth birthday crossing the Kansas plains. Her father became very ill with cholera and died two days later. Her mother and the four children continued on to Salt Lake, arriving 1 Oct 1854. They then went on to Tooele, Tooele, Utah to live with her brother, George.
In May of 1860, when Martha was sixteen, she married George Tanner. They were sealed in 1865 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Martha and George were pioneer farmers in Tooele, Tooele, Utah. They lived several miles from the center of Tooele. When the children got old enough to go to school they went on horseback. In the winter, the children didn’t always go to school as Martha thought it was too dangerous and cold to send them. Martha must have a hard time in child bearing as five of their nine children died as infants.
Martha and George were the parents of nine children:
Name: Birth Date: Death Date:

1. George Craner Tanner 29 Jun 1861 1 May 1917
2. Mary Elizabeth Tanner 5 Nov 1862 29 Feb 1952
3. James Tanner Abt 1864 child
4. Thomas Craner Tanner 9 Aug 1865 10 Feb 1917
5. William Tanner abt 1867 child
6. Joseph Tanner abt 1868 child
7. Harriet Ann Tanner abt 1869 child
8. Martha Tanner abt 1870 child
9. John Alma Tanner 9 Mar 1872 23 Jan 1958

Martha’s husband, George Tanner, died 17 April 1872, leaving her with a baby only a month old and three other children, ages 11 and younger. This must have been a difficult time for her. Her sister Harriet Ann died two years later, 15 Sep 1874, leaving a baby just a month old and seven other children. In June 1875, Martha married Harriet Ann’s husband, Alexander Harris. They lived in Gentile Valley, (Thatcher) Idaho. They obtained a fine cattle ranch, where “they prospered and enjoyed the business of stock raising.” (Logan Herald-Journal) They also lived in Mound Valley, (Cleveland) Idaho.
Martha and Alexander were the parents of six children:

Name: Birth Date: Death Date:
1. Daniel Hammer Harris 11 May 1876 23 Nov 1943
2. Frank Albert Harris 8 Jul 1877 22 Jun 1962
3. Louisa Harris 28 Jul 1880 14 Apr 1967
4. Charles Eli Harris 7 May 1882 25 May 1957
5. Annie Jane Harris 8 Feb 1884 29 May 1957
6. Darcus Harris 1886 Child
Martha endured all the hardships and challenges of pioneer life and of raising a large family. Not only was she mother to her own children, but she took on the role of mother to her sister’s family. Shortly after Alexander’s death, Martha filed on a homestead at Turner, Idaho. Martha died 19 September 1916 in Cleveland, Franklin, Idaho and was buried there. She was 72 years old.
Sources: Family Group Sheets, Naomi Lowe, 607 Holiday Drive, Brigham City, Utah 84302
Histories from Vera McBride, Beth Sorenson, 5311 Brush Creek Bay, West Valley City, Utah 84120
Maxstoke England Parish Records, Immigration Records, Tooele, Utah Census Records
Archives of the Genealogical Society of Utah, 47 East South Temple, Salt Lake City, Utah

 
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